Risk of Esophageal Cancer Decreases With Height, According to New Study.

September 26, 2014

Taller individuals are less likely to develop esophageal cancer [adenocarinoma] and it’s precursor, Barrett’s esophagus, according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association.

Esophageal cancer is the fastest growing cancer in the United States, with over a 600% increase in the past decades.  

Esophageal cancer is also one of the most deadly of cancers, with an overall 5 year survival rate of only 17.5%.  There are no standard or routine screenings to detect esophageal cancer in its earliest stages and symptoms often arise once the cancer has spread.  Esophageal cancer is often diagnosed in later stages reflecting on the fact that Stage IV esophageal cancer has a survival rate of only 3.8%.  With no known risk factors, research such as this is imperative to finding clues as to what causes this lethal disease.

Taller individuals are less likely to develop esophageal cancer [adenocarinoma] and it’s precursor, Barrett’s esophagus, according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association.“Individuals in the lowest quartile of height (under 5’7″ for men and 5’2″ for women) were roughly twice as likely as individuals in the highest quartile of height (taller than 6′ for men and 5’5″ for women) to have Barrett’s esophagus or esophageal cancer,” said Aaron P. Thrift, PhD, lead study author from the Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

“Interestingly, the relationship between height and esophageal cancer is opposite from many other cancers — including colorectal, prostate and breast — where greater height is associated with an increased risk.”

Researchers conducted a large pooled analysis using data from 14 population-based epidemiologic studies within the International Barrett’s and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON), including 1,000 cases of esophageal cancer and twice as many cases of Barrett’s esophagus, and twice as many controls.

The researchers conducted multiple analyses, including using Mendelian randomization (which incorporates genetic information with traditional approaches) to overcome issues of confounding and bias. The results from all analyses consistently demonstrated an inverse association between height and Barrett’s esophagus or esophageal cancer. There were no differences in these estimates based on sex, age, education, smoking, GERD symptoms or body mass index. Adjusting for abdominal obesity yielded similar results.

“The identification of risk factors, such as height, will allow us to create more sophisticated and accurate methods to quantify patient risk, which will hopefully be used in the future to decide who should undergo endoscopic screening for these conditions,” added Dr. Thrift.

The researchers report no obvious explanation for the association between short height and Barrett’s esophagus or esophageal cancer. Future studies investigating the potential causal mechanisms by which risk for Barrett’s esophagus or esophageal cancer might be influenced by height are justified.

Esophageal cancer incidence increased eight-fold in the U.S. from 1973 to 2008. Almost all cases arise from Barrett’s esophagus. Learn more about the management of Barrett’s esophagus in the American Gastroenterological Association medical position statement.

Source:
American Gastroenterological Association  1 Thrift, A. P., Risk of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Decreases With Height, Based on Consortium Analysis and Confirmed by Mendelian Randomization. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2014: 12(10): 1667-1676.e1 

Screening for Barrett’s esophagus: Coming to a van near you?!

September 25, 2014

New studies suggest that a screening method called “transnasal endoscopy” (TNE) has promise to become a more acceptable tool to detect Barrett’s esophagus (BE) than traditional esophagoscopy.

Just as its name suggests, during a transnasal endoscopy, a tool called an endoscope passes through the nose, whereas during a regular endoscopy, the tube passes through the mouth.

An endoscope is a small, ultra-thin, flexible tube with a camera on the end of it. It is used to view the back of the throat, esophagus and upper region of the stomach.

Unlike a regular endoscopy, TNE is performed without sedation and as stated in an article from Gastroenterology and Endoscopy News, although “patients who underwent sedated endoscopy reported less discomfort, unsedated TNE was generally well tolerated and approximately 80% of patients who underwent the procedure said they would be willing to do so again in the future.”

Not only is this already widespread method of endoscopy associated with shorter procedure times, it is portable! One study used a van (similar in size to a food truck), which was set up as a mobile research unit to examine the feasibility of screening with TNE.

New studies suggest that transnasal endoscopy could become more acceptable as a portable screening tool for Barrett’s esophagus.

Transnasal endoscopy could become more acceptable as a portable screening tool for Barrett’s esophagus.

So what’s behind the feasibility of this screening method? The answer: the development of smaller “screening” units which utilize disposable sheaths.

A sheath prevents contact between the endoscope and the patient. This does away with the need to sterilize the scope and increases the ability to “mobilize” the screening units.

So, will you find a “transnasal screening van” beside your favorite food truck? Although it would be quite convenient and possibly ironic if your heartburn is also triggered by your favorite food truck, the likelihood of routine TNE screenings isn’t very high.

GastroEndoNews.com also reported Joel Richter, MD, director of the Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition at the University of South Florida, in Tampa, as saying “most patients prefer to be put to sleep.” In addition, “Dr. Richter also noted that optimal biopsies, which are more consistently obtained with a conventional scope, are required for patients with BE.”

A second study, using the same data as the “portable TNE study”, concluded that “substantial rates of BE can be identified in patients with obesity whether or not they complain of symptoms of Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD)”

Nicholas R. Crews, MD, a fellow in Mayo’s Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology state in the same article that these findings: “directly challenges the established [GERD]-based screening paradigm for BE and provides strong rationale for using central obesity in Caucasian males, with or without [GERD], as a criterion for screening.”

“Both new studies were presented by investigators at Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn., at Digestive Disease Week 2014 (DDW). Prasad G. Iyer, MD, a consultant in the Barrett’s Esophagus Unit in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Mayo, led the work.”

To read more of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy News’s article, please visit: Transnasal Endoscopy To Go?

Sources:

Gastronterology Endoscopy News
Surgone Forgut Institute
The Physicinas Clinic 

Lifestyle choices and avoidable factors contribute to more than 50 percent of cancer deaths, according to AACR status report.

September 23, 2014

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) issued its latest Cancer Progress Report on September 16, 2014. The report suggests that “most cancer deaths – more than 50 percent – in the United States can be avoided.” The AACR report indicates that certain lifestyle choices and other avoidable factors contribute to more than 50 percent of cancer deaths.”

American Assocation of Cancer Research- Preventable Cancer - Esophageal Cancer - Awareness- Research

 

“Many of the greatest reductions in the morbidity and mortality of cancer have resulted from advances in cancer prevention and early detection. Yet more than 50 percent of the 580,350 cancer deaths expected to occur in the United States in 2013 will be related to preventable causes” the AACR report stated.

It is certainly true that one can lower their risk of developing cancer, including cancer of the esophagus. Unfortunately, not all esophageal cancer diagnosis can be prevented. In fact, researchers currently do not yet know exactly what causes most esophageal cancers. However, the AACR does outline several risk factors that can attribute to a decrease in the risk of developing esophageal cancer.

The AACR report states: “…most notable among these causes are tobacco use, obesity, poor diet, lack of physical activity…and failure to use or comply with interventions that treat or prevent infectious causes of cancer.”
The AACR report states, for instance, that “you are 50 percent less likely to develop mouth, throat, esophageal and bladder cancer five years after stopping smoking.”

In addition to smoking, the report indicates that “obesity increases risk for a growing number of cancers, most prominently the adenocarcinoma subtype of esophageal cancer” along with a number of other cancers.

Other known risk factors of esophageal cancer include Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), which is also known as acid reflux disease (chronic heartburn), poor nutrition, excessive alcohol use and Barrett’s esophagus.

The report does highlight positive news regarding a significant decline in the number of cancer deaths since past decades. Charles L. Sawyers, M.D., AACR President and Margaret Foti, Ph.D., M.D.(h.c.), AACR Chief Executive Officer, credit scientific discoveries for a “decrease in the incidence of many of the more than 200 types of cancer, cures for a number of these diseases and higher quality and longer lives for many individuals whose cancers cannot yet be prevented or cured.”

Esophageal cancer, however, has not seen such decreases, cures or higher quality and longer life for those whose cancers cannot yet be prevented or cured.

As the fastest growing cancer in the United States, esophageal cancer has instead seen an increase of over 600% in the past decades. Esophageal cancer is also one of the most deadly of cancers, with an overall 5 year survival rate of only 17.5%.
What is worse is that there is no standard or routine screening to detect esophageal cancer in its earliest stages and symptoms often arise once the cancer has spread.

This contributes greatly to the fact that esophageal cancer, which has no known cure, is often diagnosed in later stages reflecting on the fact that Stage IV esophageal cancer has a survival rate of only 3.8%.

The culprit? A tremendous lack of public awareness regarding risk factors and symptoms, no standard or routine methods for early detection and very little government or private research funding allocated for esophageal cancer.

As we continue to rally efforts in favor of awareness, early detection and research for esophageal cancer, we urge you to join this mission. Educate yourself regarding risk factors and symptoms of esophageal cancer and tell everyone you know.

The more that people know about esophageal cancer, the better the chances of saving lives. Visit us on Facebook to help spread the message and invite your friends to “like” the page. To contribute directly to life-saving research projects, click here. Remember, only through awareness and precious research funding of esophageal cancer will we ever see a cure.

 

Sources:

American Association of Cancer Research (AACR)
American Cancer Society
Baptist Health South Florida
American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
National Cancer Institute (NIH)

Can An Alkaline Diet Prevent Esophageal Cancer?

August 26, 2014

An alkaline diet, also known as an acid alkaline diet, resembles the diet of our hunter-gatherer ancestors. Consisting of mainly fresh fruit, vegetables, nuts and legumes, the alkaline diet typically only includes small amounts of meat and dairy products.

Our bodies digest, absorb and metalbolize the foods we eat and then release either an acid or an alkaline base into the bloodstream. A Western diet, which is high in processed foods and decreased amounts of fresh fruits and vegetables, is more acid producing. Alkaline supporters believe that our diets should reflect a pH level that is alkaline and to maintain a diet which is low in acid-producing foods. Many believe that an alkaline diet can help to lose weight, increase energy levels and reduce the risk of disease and some cancers.¹

It is important to note that there is no specific evidence supporting the use of an alkaline diet or alkaline supplements in cancer.

Bill Henderson first described a diet which he proposed may have the ability to treat cancer in his book “Cancer-Free: Your Guide to Gentle Non-Toxic Healing.” This diet is known as “The Bill Henderson Protocol” (BHP). The BHP recommends restriction of some foods (acid-producing) and including some supplements which will “counter the excess acidity he believes to be a contributing factor in the development of cancer.” Again, we stress that there is little supporting evidence that shows the effectiveness of these diets to treat or prevent cancer.

Professor Justin Stebbing, an oncologist at Bupa Cromwell Hospital stated in an article from the DailyMail that “data indicates that a diet high in fruit and vegetables can improve outcomes for cancer patients going through treatment.” ²

A German study was conducted in 2009 which studied the alkalizing effects of certain supplements. This preliminary research showed that alkalizing supplementation could be useful “if bodily pH does in fact play a role in cancer.” ³
There is no question that an alkaline diet has the ability to greatly benefit health as it stresses the consumption of fresh fruits, vegetables and plant-based foods while discouraging the consumption of processed foods, dairy and meat.

An alkaline diet has also shown to benefit some acid reflux sufferers. RefluxMD suggests that alkaline water could help reduce symtoms of acid reflux disease. “Our hypothesis was that since water has the potential to reduce acid reflux symptoms by a dilution effect, alkaline water (pH 9) might provide an additional benefit to GERD sufferers due to its alkaline nature.” (Twitter: @RefluxMD)

This is especially important considering Gastroesophageal Reflux Diesase (GERD) which, if not properly treated, can lead to an increased risk of Barrett’s Esophagus and esophageal cancer. (Read more: How is heartburn linked to esophageal cancer?)

Before making any changes to your health, it is important to consult your doctor.  A nutritionist can also help guide you if you choose to go alkaline.  To get your conversation started, take a look at Alkalife’s Ultimate Acid-Alkaline Food and Drink Chart.”  (Twitter: @Alkalife)

 

alkaline diet food cancer prevention nutrition health

View the full chart here: http://alkalife.com

 

 

Sources:
 
Henderson B. Cancer-Free: Your Guide to Gentle Non-Toxic Healing. 2nd. Booklocker.com; Bangor, ME, USA: 2007.
 
Components of an Anticancer Diet: Dietary Recommendations, Restrictions and Supplements of the Bill Henderson Protocol Copyright © 2011 by Cynthia Mannion,* Stacey Page, Laurie Heilman Bell, and Marja Verhoef. ; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3257729
 
Konig D., Muser K., Dickhuth H.H., Berg A., Deibert P. Effect of a supplement rich in alkaline minerals on acid-base balance in humans.Nutr. J. 2009;8:23.
 
Brewer, A. Keith PhD, Cancer, Its Nature and a Proposed Treatment, 1997; Brewer Science Library; http://www.mwt.net/~drbrewer/brew_art.htm
 
The ultimate acid-alkaline food and drink chart Alkalife; http://alkalife.com
 
The results are in! Consider drinking alkaline water to relieve your heartburn symptoms!, RefluxMD.com http://www.refluxmd.com/learn/resources/2013-12-27/6607/results-are-consider-drinking-alkaline-water-relieve-your-heartburn

Farmers Markets: Good For The Community, Great For Your Health!

August 22, 2014

Farmers markets are a wonderful way to find locally grown, nutritious and delicious foods.  A healthy, well-balanced diet is especially important in preventing cancer and a long-list of other diseases. Ensuring that you and your family are eating nutritious foods can put you on the road to optimal and long-lasting health. Not to mention, a healthy diet can combat heartburn and other Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms.

We were excited to read RefluxMD’s recent article “Try the farmers market to improve your GERD diet” and want to share their expert advice with all of you! (Check them out on Facebook!)

Take advantage of your local farmers markets! It is also a great way to get the entire family involved and to teach your children the importance of nutrition and suppotitg your local community.

Since our home office is located in Rhode Island, here is a link to FarmFreshRI’s list of farmers markets in Rhode Island.

“A healthy diet is critical to helping you control your GERD.” – RefluxMD

To find farmers markets in your area, ask your family or friends, visit your local library or search the web. Don’t underestimate the power of Google or Bing to find your local avenue to fresh, home-grown food!

Make sure to send us a picture of you at your local farmers market! Use the hashtag #SalgiFoundation on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram! Don’t forget to follow us, too!


The Lower Esophageal Sphincter; An Important Muscle You Didn’t Know You Had.

August 14, 2014

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), a risk factor of esophageal cancer, is also known as “acid reflux disease” or “chronic heartburn.”  GERD occurs when stomach acids flow backwards into the esophagus.

The culprit?  Your lower esophageal sphincter (LES).  

The LES is a ring of muscle that open to allow food and drink to pass into the stomach from the mouth.

A normal functioning LES then closes to keep those contents inside the stomach to allow for digestion. When the LES is damaged, it becomes weak and relaxes, allowing stomach acids and contents to flow back up into the esophagus. This “reflux” symptom is known as heartburn.

Lower esophageal sphincter (LES), Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Esophageal cancer, heartburn, acid reflux, reflux, chronic heartburn, awareness, education

While not all GERD sufferers experience this symptom (heartburn), people who do suffer from heartburn more than twice a week should speak with their doctor.

It has not been clearly established what causes the LES to become damaged. However, doctors have indicated that pressure on the midsection caused by obesity, frequently eating large meals and hiatal hernia can damage this important muscle.

Overtime, the reflux of stomach acids damages the lining of the esophageal wall and can cause the cells to become abnormal and potentially lead to esophageal cancer.  This change in the cells, which line the lower part of the esophageal wall, is known as Barrett’s esophagus, a sometimes precancerous condition. However, Barrett’s esophagus isn’t the only precursor to esophageal cancer.

There are no standard or routine screenings to detect esophageal cancer in its earlier stages, when the tumors can be better treated. Unfortunately, symptoms such as difficulty swallowing and food getting stuck typically appear once the cancer has spread. When esophageal cancer is diagnosed at later stages, there is a poor survival rate, as treatment options are limited and mostly used to treat cancer symptoms, not towards curing the cancer. Stage IV has a survival rate of only 3.8%. The earlier esophageal cancer is detected, the better chances for survival.

It is imperative that patients suffering from chronic and frequent heartburn be proactive and talk to their doctor. For some, lifestyle changes can help to alleviate GERD symptoms. Others may need to take medications (Please read the label on the bottle! Most medications are recommended to be taken no longer than for 8 to 12 weeks.) Some patients may be candidates for nonsurgical, less invasive options to treat GERD.

It is extremely important that patients speak to with their doctor about tests to screen for esophageal cancer.   Remember, early detection saves lives!  Feel free to share this information with your family and friends. We’ve included social media buttons below to make sharing simple.

Donations are what fuel awareness programs and research projects working to find a cure for esophageal cancer.  All donations are tax-deductible and can be made online.

Click here to make a one-time or recurring donation.  Thank you in advance for joining us in this mission to save lives and find a cure!

 

Sources:
Cancer.gov
Cancer.org
RefluxMD.com

What does a dozen eggs and esophageal cancer have in common?

July 31, 2014

The answer is twelve.  A dozen medical research groups from across the United States have requested funding for their research projects specifically dedicated to esophageal cancer.

esophageal cancer, esophageal cancer ri, esophagus cancer, cancer of the esophagus, cancer ri, ri cancer, ri esophageal cancer, cancer treatment, cancer ri treatment, esophageal cancer treatment, esophageal cancer treatment ri, rhode island cancer, cancer rhode island, nonprofit, non profit ri, ri nonprofit, ri non-profit, esophageal non profit, esophagus, barret esophagus, barret esophagus ri, esophagus ri, ri esophagus, esophageal cancer rhode island, gerd, GERD ri, ri gerd, GERD treatment, GERD, GERD help, heartburn, heartburn ri, heartburn treatment, treatment heartburn, acid reflux, acid reflux ri, acid reflux treatment, acid reflux help, ri acid reflux, esophageal cancer, esophageal cancer ri, ri cancer, cancer ri, cancer rhode island, esophageal cancer rhode island, rhode island esophageal cancer, heartburn, acid reflux, gerd, reflux, gerd reflux, acid, pain in chest, doctor ri, gi doctor ri, gastroenterologist ri, ri gastroenterologist, ri health, health ri, esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer treatment, esophageal cancer diagnosis, esophageal cancer research, esophageal cancer donate, esophageal cancer funding, esophageal cancer fund, esophageal cancer funds, esophageal cancer , esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer nonprofit, esophageal cancer events, esophageal cancer rhode island, esophageal cancer new england, esophageal cancer Massachusetts, esophageal cancer screening, esophageal cancer detection, esophageal cancer signs, esophageal cancer symptoms, esophageal cancer diagnosis, esophageal cancer doctors, esophageal cancer doctors in ri, esophageal cancer doctor ri, esophageal cancer symptom, esophageal cancer heartburn, heartburn can cause cancer, cancer heartburn, heartburn cancer, esophageal cancer salgi, esophageal cancer rates, esophageal cancer death, esophageal cancer death rate, esophageal cancer survivors, esophageal cancer survivor, esophageal cancer survivorship, esophageal cancer surviving, esophageal cancer groups, esophageal cancer organizations, esophageal cancer teams, esophageal cancer board, esophageal cancer charity, esophageal cancer nonprofit, esophageal cancer money for research, Networking RI, cancer ri, esophageal cancer, cancer in ri, networking event ri, cancer charity, cancer research, cancer charity ri, cancer research ri, esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer awareness ri, esophageal cancer research ri, esophageal cancer research, esophageal cancer prevention, esophageal cancer prevention ri, esophageal cancer cure, esophageal cancer, in hopes of a cure, networking cancer, cocktails in hopes of a cure, cocktails, Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run, Cancer Walk, Cancer Walk RI, Walk RI, Run RI, Rhode Island Walk, Rhode Island Cancer, Cancer Walks in RI, Cancer Run in RI, Run for charity, Run in RI, cancer run, cancer walk, cancer walk ri, cancer run ri, esophageal cancer, cancer of the esophagus, cancer, esophageal cancer ri, cancer of esophagus, ri cancer, cancer awareness, cancer research, cancer prevention, ri cancer research, ri cancer prevention, ri cancer treatment, ri cancer charity, charity ri, charity, cancer, treat esophageal cancer, treat cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer ri, acid reflux, heartburn can cause cancer, heartburn ri, acid reflux ri, heartburn, heartburn remedy, heartburn remedies, acid reflux remedies, charity run ri, charity walk ri, run for cancer, active, proactive, action, take action, gerd, heartburn and cancer, esophagus heartburn, hurts to swallow, painful swallowing, esophageal cancer, esophageal cancer ri, ri cancer, cancer ri, cancer rhode island, esophageal cancer rhode island, rhode island esophageal cancer, heartburn, acid reflux, gerd, reflux, gerd reflux, acid, pain in chest, doctor ri, gi doctor ri, gastroenterologist ri, ri gastroenterologist, ri health, health ri, esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer treatment, esophageal cancer diagnosis, esophageal cancer research, esophageal cancer donate, esophageal cancer funding, esophageal cancer fund, esophageal cancer funds, esophageal cancer , esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer nonprofit, esophageal cancer events, esophageal cancer rhode island, esophageal cancer new england, esophageal cancer Massachusetts, esophageal cancer screening, esophageal cancer detection, esophageal cancer signs, esophageal cancer symptoms, esophageal cancer diagnosis, esophageal cancer doctors, esophageal cancer doctors in ri, esophageal cancer doctor ri, esophageal cancer symptom, esophageal cancer heartburn, heartburn can cause cancer, cancer heartburn, heartburn cancer, esophageal cancer salgi, esophageal cancer rates, esophageal cancer death, esophageal cancer death rate, esophageal cancer survivors, esophageal cancer survivor, esophageal cancer survivorship, esophageal cancer surviving, esophageal cancer groups, esophageal cancer organizations, esophageal cancer teams, esophageal cancer board, esophageal cancer charity, esophageal cancer nonprofit, esophageal cancer money for research, the salgi foundation, the salgi esophageal cancer research foundation, salgi, salgi foundation, salgi esophageal, salgi esophageal cancer, salgi esophageal cancer research, salgi esophageal cancer research foundation, salgi esophageal foundation, foundation salgi, esophageal cancer awareness salgi, esophageal cancer awareness salgi ri, ri esophageal cancer awareness salgi, ri salgi esophageal cancer, salgi esophageal cancer awareness ri salgi, salgi treatment esophageal cancer, salgi treatment esophageal cancer awareness, salgi treatment esophageal cancer awareness ri, Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run, Cancer Walk, Cancer Walk RI, Walk RI, Run RI, Rhode Island Walk, Rhode Island Cancer, Cancer Walks in RI, Cancer Run in RI, Run for charity, Run in RI, cancer run, cancer walk, cancer walk ri, cancer run ri, esophageal cancer, cancer of the esophagus, cancer, esophageal cancer ri, cancer of esophagus, ri cancer, cancer awareness, cancer research, cancer prevention, ri cancer research, ri cancer prevention, ri cancer treatment, ri cancer charity, charity ri, charity, cancer, treat esophageal cancer, treat cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer ri, acid reflux, heartburn can cause cancer, heartburn ri, acid reflux ri, heartburn, heartburn remedy, heartburn remedies, acid reflux remedies, charity run ri, charity walk ri, run for cancer

Research funding for esophageal cancer is crucial to saving lives and finding a cure.  Unfortunately, esophageal cancer research is extremely underfunded, both from private funders and the government.

The National Cancer Institute decreased funding for research of esophageal cancer by 15% in 2012. Esophageal cancer now receives a mere $28.0 million out of NCI’s total $5.07 billion budget. That is approximately half of one percent.

While The American Cancer Society reports that they currently fund 1,165 cancer research projects, only 8 of those research projects are related to esophageal cancer.

Diagnosis of esophageal cancer is skyrocketing, with over a 600% increase in the past decades, making esophageal adenocarcinoma the fastest growing cancer in the United States. In order to reduce these incidences of esophageal cancer, we aim to fund research projects whose emphasis is to prevent esophageal cancer and to discover innovative screening tests to detect esophageal cancer in its earliest stages, when the tumors are more treatable.

Esophageal cancer is also amongst the deadliest of cancers, with a five year survival rate of only 17.85%. In order to combat these dismal survival rates, we work to fund research that will improve current treatment options.

The survival rate for Stage IV esophageal cancer is only 3.8%. Unfortunately, at later stages, esophageal cancer can be treated but rarely cured.  Patients diagnosed with advanced esophageal cancer often have widespread cancer at the time of diagnosis and cannot be cured with surgery.  Treatment options are usually to relieve symptoms caused by the cancer and to improve quality of life.

esophageal cancer, esophageal cancer ri, esophagus cancer, cancer of the esophagus, cancer ri, ri cancer, ri esophageal cancer, cancer treatment, cancer ri treatment, esophageal cancer treatment, esophageal cancer treatment ri, rhode island cancer, cancer rhode island, nonprofit, non profit ri, ri nonprofit, ri non-profit, esophageal non profit, esophagus, barret esophagus, barret esophagus ri, esophagus ri, ri esophagus, esophageal cancer rhode island, gerd, GERD ri, ri gerd, GERD treatment, GERD, GERD help, heartburn, heartburn ri, heartburn treatment, treatment heartburn, acid reflux, acid reflux ri, acid reflux treatment, acid reflux help, ri acid reflux, esophageal cancer, esophageal cancer ri, ri cancer, cancer ri, cancer rhode island, esophageal cancer rhode island, rhode island esophageal cancer, heartburn, acid reflux, gerd, reflux, gerd reflux, acid, pain in chest, doctor ri, gi doctor ri, gastroenterologist ri, ri gastroenterologist, ri health, health ri, esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer treatment, esophageal cancer diagnosis, esophageal cancer research, esophageal cancer donate, esophageal cancer funding, esophageal cancer fund, esophageal cancer funds, esophageal cancer , esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer nonprofit, esophageal cancer events, esophageal cancer rhode island, esophageal cancer new england, esophageal cancer Massachusetts, esophageal cancer screening, esophageal cancer detection, esophageal cancer signs, esophageal cancer symptoms, esophageal cancer diagnosis, esophageal cancer doctors, esophageal cancer doctors in ri, esophageal cancer doctor ri, esophageal cancer symptom, esophageal cancer heartburn, heartburn can cause cancer, cancer heartburn, heartburn cancer, esophageal cancer salgi, esophageal cancer rates, esophageal cancer death, esophageal cancer death rate, esophageal cancer survivors, esophageal cancer survivor, esophageal cancer survivorship, esophageal cancer surviving, esophageal cancer groups, esophageal cancer organizations, esophageal cancer teams, esophageal cancer board, esophageal cancer charity, esophageal cancer nonprofit, esophageal cancer money for research, Networking RI, cancer ri, esophageal cancer, cancer in ri, networking event ri, cancer charity, cancer research, cancer charity ri, cancer research ri, esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer awareness ri, esophageal cancer research ri, esophageal cancer research, esophageal cancer prevention, esophageal cancer prevention ri, esophageal cancer cure, esophageal cancer, in hopes of a cure, networking cancer, cocktails in hopes of a cure, cocktails, Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run, Cancer Walk, Cancer Walk RI, Walk RI, Run RI, Rhode Island Walk, Rhode Island Cancer, Cancer Walks in RI, Cancer Run in RI, Run for charity, Run in RI, cancer run, cancer walk, cancer walk ri, cancer run ri, esophageal cancer, cancer of the esophagus, cancer, esophageal cancer ri, cancer of esophagus, ri cancer, cancer awareness, cancer research, cancer prevention, ri cancer research, ri cancer prevention, ri cancer treatment, ri cancer charity, charity ri, charity, cancer, treat esophageal cancer, treat cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer ri, acid reflux, heartburn can cause cancer, heartburn ri, acid reflux ri, heartburn, heartburn remedy, heartburn remedies, acid reflux remedies, charity run ri, charity walk ri, run for cancer esophageal cancer, esophageal cancer ri, ri cancer, cancer ri, cancer rhode island, esophageal cancer rhode island, rhode island esophageal cancer, heartburn, acid reflux, gerd, reflux, gerd reflux, acid, pain in chest, doctor ri, gi doctor ri, gastroenterologist ri, ri gastroenterologist, ri health, health ri, esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer treatment, esophageal cancer diagnosis, esophageal cancer research, esophageal cancer donate, esophageal cancer funding, esophageal cancer fund, esophageal cancer funds, esophageal cancer , esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer nonprofit, esophageal cancer events, esophageal cancer rhode island, esophageal cancer new england, esophageal cancer Massachusetts, esophageal cancer screening, esophageal cancer detection, esophageal cancer signs, esophageal cancer symptoms, esophageal cancer diagnosis, esophageal cancer doctors, esophageal cancer doctors in ri, esophageal cancer doctor ri, esophageal cancer symptom, esophageal cancer heartburn, heartburn can cause cancer, cancer heartburn, heartburn cancer, esophageal cancer salgi, esophageal cancer rates, esophageal cancer death, esophageal cancer death rate, esophageal cancer survivors, esophageal cancer survivor, esophageal cancer survivorship, esophageal cancer surviving, esophageal cancer groups, esophageal cancer organizations, esophageal cancer teams, esophageal cancer board, esophageal cancer charity, esophageal cancer nonprofit, esophageal cancer money for research, the salgi foundation, the salgi esophageal cancer research foundation, salgi, salgi foundation, salgi esophageal, salgi esophageal cancer, salgi esophageal cancer research, salgi esophageal cancer research foundation, salgi esophageal foundation, foundation salgi, esophageal cancer awareness salgi, esophageal cancer awareness salgi ri, ri esophageal cancer awareness salgi, ri salgi esophageal cancer, salgi esophageal cancer awareness ri salgi, salgi treatment esophageal cancer, salgi treatment esophageal cancer awareness, salgi treatment esophageal cancer awareness ri, Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run, Cancer Walk, Cancer Walk RI, Walk RI, Run RI, Rhode Island Walk, Rhode Island Cancer, Cancer Walks in RI, Cancer Run in RI, Run for charity, Run in RI, cancer run, cancer walk, cancer walk ri, cancer run ri, esophageal cancer, cancer of the esophagus, cancer, esophageal cancer ri, cancer of esophagus, ri cancer, cancer awareness, cancer research, cancer prevention, ri cancer research, ri cancer prevention, ri cancer treatment, ri cancer charity, charity ri, charity, cancer, treat esophageal cancer, treat cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer ri, acid reflux, heartburn can cause cancer, heartburn ri, acid reflux ri, heartburn, heartburn remedy, heartburn remedies, acid reflux remedies, charity run ri, charity walk ri, run for cancer

While the ultimate goal is to prevent 100% of any diagnosis of esophageal cancer through prevention and early detection, right now there is a drastic need to discover treatment options which have the potential of curing metastatic (advanced) esophageal cancer.

Our mission is to fund research projects to save lives and find a cure. One day, esophageal cancer will be history. Any donation will help make a difference. It is through small developments which generate knowledge that guides the way to significant advances and breakthroughs.

To make a 100% tax-deductible donation to life-saving esophageal cancer research projects, please click here.

If you would like to host a fundraiser benefiting esophageal cancer research, please contact us here.

 

Sources:
cancer.gov
surgery.ucsf.edu
cancer.org 
texasoncology.com