Bravelets

April 21, 2017

April is Esophageal Cancer Awareness Month! This month, Bravelets has partnered with our charity to help raise awareness and funding for esophageal cancer research and advocacy.

Our President, Linda Molfesi, was able to share our mission and history with their team.  Visit their blog page here to read what she had to say.

Through the end of April, 2017, you can donate 20% of your purchase to The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation with code: SALGI20 at checkout. Visit our Bravelets Brave Page here.

To learn more about Bravelets, their mission, history and why they decided to partner with The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation, keep reading below!

 

 

 

 

 

What is Bravelets’ mission?

Bravelets was founded in 2012 and the Bravelets mission is to help people be brave during hard times. It is such a simple idea that started with one bracelet, in 10 colors, helping 10 different non-profits. We have now grown to over 30 products in 16 colors, helping close to 4,000 personal causes and nonprofits around the country. There are times in all of our lives where we need to be brave – whether for ourselves, for our family, for our friends, or even for a complete stranger. Bravelets bracelets are more than just something to wear on your wrist. All Bravelets jewelry and accessories are symbols of hope, strength and courage. They are designed to help you be brave in the toughest of times.

How did Bravelets begin?

Stephanie started Bravelets in 2012 after her mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. She wanted something the whole family could wear as a symbol of hope. Something they could look at every day, and remember to be brave. She also wanted something that gave back to the cause she cared about, which is why with every item purchased from Bravelets 10% is donated back to the cause of the customer’s choice.

How Bravelets has made an impact for nonprofits?

We offer the ability for anyone to set up a fundraiser for anything they feel they need to be brave for! Many people set up fundraisers in support of their favorite nonprofit, or they set up a personal fundraiser to raise money for their medical bills or local causes in their community. To date, we’ve raised over $2.6 million dollars for various personal causes and non-profits. Aside from the financial impact, the personal connection we’ve made with non-profits and hearing the stories of the people their research and mission’s effects is even more rewarding.
Bravelets gives nonprofits the opportunity to raise money in a special way

Why Bravelets chose to donate to nonprofits?

Bravelets is unique, because we provide a platform for anyone to choose to give back to any cause they wish to support. If they are searching for a specific cause but can’t seem to find the right one, we give them the opportunity to create a quick fundraising page for that cause!

Why did Bravelets choose to work with The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation?

April is Esophageal Cancer Month, and we think it’s great to partner with non-profits that specifically work towards research and awareness about that cause! The Salgi Esophageal Cancer is making strides to bring awareness about early detection and we are proud to help support them.

What are Bravelets goals and plans for the future?

Bravelets is on track to raise another $2 Million for causes around the nation! We are excited about the support we are able give people each and every day, and the donations that are going back into our communities. We always have new products rolling out, and new causes joining our mission! We are excited to see how Bravelets continues to impact people’s lives and outlook on life!

Remember, through the end of April. 2017, you can donate 20% of your purchase to The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation with code: SALGI20 at checkout. Visit our Bravelets Brave Page here.  Please share this post with all of your family members and friends!  Thank you!

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April Esophageal Cancer Awareness Video Slideshow

March 30, 2017

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation has put together a video slideshow of the brave men and women who have been affected by esophageal cancer- those who have survived, those who have passed away and those who are currently fighting this horrific cancer.

Please consider making a donation.  This charity is sustained 100% by the generosity of our donors.  In order to continue this mission of raising awareness, encouraging early detection and funding research of esophageal cancer, we ask you to consider making a tax-deductible donation.  Click here to donate.

 

The goal of this video slideshow is to raise awareness of the fact that esophageal cancer is growing at a rapid rate and affecting people of all ages, race and gender.  Please subscribe to our YouTube channel and share the video with your friends, family and social media.  Be sure to tag us in your posts! (@SalgiFoundation)  With your help, we will make a difference!

Thank you!

2015 FINAL LOGO HIGH RES RGB


Submit your photo for our Esophageal Cancer Awareness Video Slideshow!

March 3, 2017

April is Esophageal Cancer Awareness Month.  This year, The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation is putting together a video slideshow of all the brave men and women who have been affected by esophageal cancer- those who have survived, those who have passed away and those who are currently fighting this horrific cancer.

slideshow april 2

If you would like to submit a photo to be included in the slideshow, please email salgifoundation @ gmail.com by Friday, March 24th at 2PM EST.   Please only send one photo per person to be included in the slideshow.  Please also include the person’s name and if applicable, the birth year and year of passing.  (I.e. John Smith, 1968-2014)

We ask you to consider making a donation to the charity along with your photo.  While donations are not mandatory for inclusion in the slideshow, this charity is sustained 100% by the generosity of our donors.  In order to continue this mission of raising awareness, encouraging early detection and funding research of esophageal cancer, we ask you to consider making a tax-deductible donation.  Click here to donate.

The goal of this video slideshow is to raise awareness of the fact that esophageal cancer is growing at a rapid rate and affecting people of all ages, race and gender.  With your help, we will make a difference!

Thank you!

2015 FINAL LOGO HIGH RES RGB


Roswell Park scientists create calculator to guide treatment choice in esophageal cancer

March 3, 2017

Via: Roswell Park Cancer Institute

Cancer of the esophagus, the hollow tube connecting the oral cavity to the stomach, is usually treated surgically. Roswell Park Cancer Institute researchers have created a novel calculator that more readily identifies patients who may benefit from therapy that reduces the extent of the disease prior to surgery. The study has been published online ahead of print by the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

Using the National Cancer Data Base, the Roswell Park team evaluated clinical data for 8,974 patients diagnosed with early-stage esophageal cancer. The database records information for as many as 70% of the nation’s cancer cases through participating hospitals. The researchers evaluated characteristics such as patients’ comorbidity score, tumor grade and neoadjuvant chemoradiation status (whether they had chemotherapy and/or radiation prior to surgery). Only preoperative data were used to develop the calculator. The scientists found that patients who benefit more from neoadjuvant chemoradiation included those whose tumors had metastasized to nearby lymph nodes, older patients and those with more aggressive cancers, such as tumors of higher grade and greater depth of invasion. These findings indicate that the calculator would assist physicians and patients with treatment decision-making.

“The use of calculators to estimate outcomes is becoming increasingly common, and is being applied to real-time clinical situations to aid in treatment decision-making and individualizing therapy,” says the lead author of the study, Emmanuel Gabriel, MD, PhD, of the Department of Surgical Oncology at Roswell Park.

“Our effort is a good example of how you can use large national databases to create calculators to guide and improve preoperative decision-making. Such tools can help us, for example, to avoid the toxic side effects of upfront chemoradiotherapy in a subset of patients. However, our calculator should be validated prospectively before firm conclusions can be drawn about its value in treatment selection,” notes the senior author of the study, Moshim Kukar, MD, Assistant Professor of Surgery in the Department of Surgical Oncology at Roswell Park.

Story Source:

Materials above provided by Roswell Park Cancer Institute.  Editor Note: Content may be edited.

Journal Refrence:

Emmanuel Gabriel, Kristopher Attwood, Rupen Shah, Steven Nurkin, Steven Hochwald, Moshim Kukar. Novel Calculator to Estimate Overall Survival Benefit from Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients with Esophageal Adenocarcinoma. Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 2017; DOI: 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2017.01.043

 

 


Esophageal cancer: Loss of muscle mass represents a significant risk to survival

February 15, 2017

via: Medical University of Vienna

Esophageal cancer patients who suffer loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) during neoadjuvant therapy (chemotherapy prior to surgery) survive, on average, 32 months less than patients with no sarcopenia. This is the central finding of a recent study conducted at the Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC) of MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital. The study has recently been published in the European Journal of Cancer Surgery.

Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common type of cancer and sixth most common cause of death from cancer in Austria. According to “Statistik Austria,” approximately 420 people develop this type of cancer every year. This means that esophageal cancer is a rare form of cancer but the number of cases has grown rapidly over the past few years. The number of cases in men has risen sixfold and has quadrupled in women, men being more likely to develop this type of cancer than women.

Esophageal cancer is among the fastest and deadliest cancers in the United States and western world.  In 2017, an estimated 16,940 will be diagnosed with esophageal cancer and there will be an estimated 15,690 deaths from esophageal cancer, in the United States.¹   Only 18.4% of patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer will survive 5(+) years.

Apart from smoking and high alcohol consumption, risk factors for esophageal cancer also include gastro-esophageal reflux disease and the resulting cell changes in the lower part of the oesophagus (Barrett metaplasia). The standard treatment for patients in which the tumour is advanced but not yet metastasised, is to give chemotherapy or a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy prior to surgery (multimodal therapy). In local carcinomas that are not advanced, surgery is the treatment of choice.

Nutrition and exercise affect chances of survival

In their study, experts in stomach and esophageal cancer from the Comprehensive Cancer Center of MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital (CCC GET-Unit, Head: Sebastian Schoppmann) investigated to what extent sarcopenia and body composition changed during multimodal therapy and whether this has any influence upon long-term survival. The results show that patients who suffered sarcopenia (loss of muscle mass below a defined threshold) at any time during treatment had a poorer prognosis for survival: on average, their period of survival was 32 months shorter than that of patients who were not diagnosed with sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was therefore identified as an independent risk factor.

Says Matthias Paireder, Department of Surgery (Head: Michael Gnant) of MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital, member of the CCC-GET and lead author of the study: “Sarcopenia is not necessarily a side effect of chemotherapy. Many patients were already sarcopenic before the treatment and there was no significant progression of sarcopenia during treatment. The reasons for this loss of general muscle mass are poor nutrition and lack of exercise.”

New study planned

In a new study, the team headed up by Paireder and Schoppmann will investigate whether a programme that includes nutritional advice and physical training could significantly increase long-term survival for esophageal cancer patients.

Story Source:

Materials above provided by Medical University of Vienna.  Editor Note: Content may be edited.

Medical University of Vienna. “Esophageal cancer: Loss of muscle mass represents a significant risk to survival.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 February 2017.


Response to an article. Acid reflux can increase esophageal cancer risk.

February 1, 2017

Our volunteers recently came across an article on PostBulletin.com entitled “[Gastroesophageal] reflux can trigger symptoms similar to cardiac problems.”  It is a Mayo Clinic Q & A piece that the Minnesota newspaper published online.

The article question was submitted by a daughter whose father had gone to the emergency room due to chest pain which the doctors said was most likely not a heart attack but could possibly be heartburn.   Jeffrey Alexander, M.D from Mayo Clinic, responded to the daughter’s question about her father’s health.  While we are pleased with most of the article, two quotes from Dr. Alexander stuck out as major red flags for anyone who suffers from Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD-which is also known as acid reflux disease).

The first quote from Dr. Alexander we would like to address is:

“Typically, GERD does not require treatment from a health care provider.”

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awareness, cancer research, cancer prevention, ri cancer research, ri cancer prevention, ri cancer treatment, ri cancer charity, charity ri, charity, cancer, treat esophageal cancer, treat cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer ri, acid reflux, heartburn can cause cancer, heartburn ri, acid reflux ri, heartburn, heartburn remedy, heartburn remedies, acid reflux remedies, charity run ri, charity walk ri, run for cancerIn the United States, approximately 20 percent of the population has GERD, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).1

One in five Americans who suffers from GERD.  If not properly treated, overtime GERD damages the lining of the esophagus and can cause serious medical conditions, i.e. chronic cough or hoarseness, bleeding or scarring of the esophagus, ulcers, Barrett’s esophagus or esophageal cancer.

Many chronic GERD sufferers turn to antacids or other over-the-counter medications for relief.  Others seek help from their doctors and are prescribed medications known as Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs), which reduce the amount of acid in the stomach; thus treating the symptoms of GERD but not the disease.  Recent research has shown that PPIs may not protect against Barrett’s esophagus and/or esophageal cancer.

Therefore, those who suffer from GERD should not self-medicate alone, but should speak with their doctor and a doctor who specializes in GERD to reduce the risk of damage to the esophagus.

This leads us to the second quote by Dr. Alexander from the article that we would like to address: 

“GERD can be managed, and nobody dies from it.”

GERD is a primary risk factor for esophageal cancer (adenocarcinoma), one of the fastest growing and deadliest cancers in the United States and the western world.  Incidences of esophageal cancer and GERD have increased significantly in past decades.  In fact, incidence of esophageal cancer has risen over 600%.  Unfortunately, esophageal cancer has an overall five-year survival rate of only 18.4%.3

While GERD in and of itself won’t cause anyone to die, the damage that GERD can cause to the esophagus very well could eventually lead people to die.Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation Esophageal Cancer Periwinkle Ribbon Esophageal Cancer Awareness Advocacy Advocate Nonprofit Charity Early Detection Research Cure

President of The Salgi Foundation, Linda Molfesi, knows all too well the dangers of heartburn and GERD.

“My father suffered from chronic heartburn for years and was never warned by doctors of the possible risks.  We found out too late, once he started having difficulty swallowing, that his chronic reflux had led to esophageal cancer.” Molfesi continued, “My father passed away a little over a year from the date he was diagnosed and it was, and still is, devastating,” Molfesi said.

In addition to esophageal cancer’s dramatic increase over the past decades and its very poor survival rates, there are currently no routine or standard screenings to detect esophageal cancer in its earliest stages.

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation urges the public to be proactive about their health.  Never ignore frequent heartburn or other symptoms and never rely on medications alone.  If you suffer from heartburn, chest pain or any other symptom, talk to your doctor about all your options, especially how you can get screened for any possible damage.

Dr. Alexander does mention that lifestyle changes can help manage GERD symptoms and he also notes common “warning” symptoms which could point to more serious problems, including esophageal cancer.

However, GERD is a progressive disease which will only get worse if not properly treated.  Once again, we must stress that it is very important to speak to your doctor if you are experiencing GERD to manage symptoms, get screened and reduce your risk of Barrett’s esophagus and/or esophageal cancer.

 

Sources:

  1. GERD by the Numbers: Facts, Statistics & You. Ann Pietrangelo. Medically Reviewed by George T. Krucik, MD, MBA on March 2, 2015. Healthline Media. healthline.com
  2. Does any acid reflux medication prevent esophageal cancer? Bruce Kaechele. RefluxMD refluxmd.com
  3. Cancer Stat Facts: Esophageal Cancer. National Cancer Institute, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program, seer.cancer.gov
  4. Gastroesophagel reflux can trigger symptoms similar to cardiac problems. Jeffrey Alexander, M.D., Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester. Mayo Clinic Q & A postbulletin.com

Breath test could help detect stomach and esophageal cancers

January 30, 2017

via: The European CanCer Organisation (ECCO)

A test that measures the levels of five chemicals in the breath has shown promising results for the detection of cancers of the esophagus and stomach in a large patient trial presented at the European Cancer Congress 2017 [1].

Together, stomach and esophageal cancer account for around 1.4 million new cancer diagnoses each year worldwide [2]. Both tend to be diagnosed late, because the symptoms are ambiguous, meaning the five-year survival rate for these two types of cancer is only 15%.

Esophageal cancer is considered one of the fastest growing and deadliest cancers in the United States and western world, with over a 600% increase in the past decades.

The new research, involving more than 300 patients, showed that the test could diagnose cancer with an overall accuracy of 85%.

Breath test could help detect stomach and oesophageal cancers 28 January 2017 The European CanCer Organisation (ECCO) | Blog: The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation 501(c)(3) nonprofit charity. Awareness, Early Detection, Research...in hopes of a cure. ™Dr Sheraz Markar, an NIHR Clinical Trials Fellow from Imperial College London, under the supervision of Professor George Hanna, told the Congress: “At present the only way to diagnose esophageal cancer or stomach cancer is with endoscopy. This method is expensive, invasive and has some risk of complications.

“A breath test could be used as a non-invasive, first-line test to reduce the number of unnecessary endoscopies. In the longer term this could also mean earlier diagnosis and treatment, and better survival.”

The trial was based on the results of previous research that suggested differences in the levels of specific chemicals (butyric, pentanoic and hexanoic acids, butanal, and decanal) between patients with stomach or esophageal cancer and patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms without cancer. The new research aimed to test whether this ‘chemical signature’ that seemed to typify cancer could be the basis of a diagnostic test.

In the new study, the research team collected breath samples from 335 people at St Mary’s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust; University College London Hospital; and the Royal Marsden Hospital, London. Of these, 163 had been diagnosed with stomach or esophageal cancer and 172 showed no evidence of cancer when they had an endoscopy.

All the samples were analysed with a technique called selected ion flow-tube mass spectrometry, which is able to accurately measure small amounts of different chemicals in mixtures of gases such as breath.

Researchers measured the levels of the five chemicals in each sample to see which ones matched to the ‘chemical signature’ that indicated cancer.

The results showed that the test was 85% accurate overall, with a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 81%. This means that not only was the breath test good at picking up those who had cancer (sensitivity), it was also good at correctly identifying who did not have cancer (specificity).

Dr Markar said: “Because cancer cells are different to healthy ones, they produce a different mixture of chemicals. This study suggests that we may be able detect these differences and use a breath test to indicate which patients are likely to have cancer of the esophagus and stomach, and which do not. However, these findings must be validated in a larger sample of patients before the test could be used in the clinic.”

Over the next three years, the researchers will continue with a larger trial, using the test with patients who are being given an endoscopy for gastrointestinal symptoms but not yet diagnosed with cancer. This will assess the ability of the test to pick up cases within a group that is likely to contain only a small percentage of cancers.

The team is also working on breath tests for other types of cancer, such as colorectal and pancreatic, which could be used as first-line tests in general practice surgeries.

Story Source:

Materials above provided by The European CanCer Organisation (ECCO).  Editor Note: Content may be edited.