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Zinc may halt the growth of esophageal cancer cells, study says.

October 3, 2017

via University of Texas at Arlington

Zinc supplements can significantly inhibit the proliferation of esophageal cancer cells, according to a new study co-authored by a University of Texas at Arlington researcher.

Previous studies had shown that zinc is essential for maintaining human health and protects the esophagus from cancer. However, it has never been fully understood why zinc has the ability to prevent cancer in the esophagus. In this study, a team led by Zui Pan, an associate professor of nursing at UTA’s College of Nursing and Health Innovation and a noted esophageal cancer researcher, discovered that zinc selectively halts the growth of cancer cells but not normal esophageal epithelial cells. The finding was published this month in The FASEB Journal, the official journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.

Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of human cancer deaths around the world, according to the National Cancer Institute. The institute estimates that there were almost 16,000 esophageal cancer deaths in the United States in 2016. The average five-year survival rate is less than 20 percent.

Pan said this study could provide a pathway for better esophageal cancer prevention and treatment.

“Zinc deficiency has been found in many cancer patients,” said Pan, whose study was funded in part by a research grant from the National Institutes of Health – National Cancer Institute. “Both clinical data and animal studies have shown that this mineral is very important for overall body health and for cancer prevention.”

Zinc is an important element in many proteins and many enzymes and the absence of zinc makes it impossible for cells to function, she added.

“But previously we didn’t know why the same physiological concentrations of zinc inhibit cancer cell growth but not normal cells. Our study, for the first time to our knowledge, reveals that zinc impedes overactive calcium signals in cancer cells, which is absent in normal cells, and thus zinc selectively inhibits cancer cell growth.” said Pan. “It now appears that zinc and calcium can have a cross talk, meaning that they can be linked.”

An insufficient amount of zinc can lead to the development of cancers and other diseases, Pan said.

“That’s why it is important to have a good diet,” she said.

Zinc enriched foods include spinach, flax seeds, beef, pumpkin seeds and seafood like shrimp and oysters.

Pan said that in the future they will study these two signals link, how they impact each other and how researchers can take advantage of what they know.  Such a step will guide them in developing a better prevention and treatment strategy, she said.

 

Story Source:

Materials above provided by University of Texas at Arlington.

Editor Note: Content may be edited.

 

Disclaimer

This post contains information provided by a press release from authors of the highlighted abstracts and reflects the content of those abstracts. It does not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation who cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of the data.

 

To read more esophageal cancer news, please visit: SALGI.org/news

Follow The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation on Facebook: Facebook.com/SalgiFoundation

 

 

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Research Points Potential Way to Effective Immunotherapy Use for Esophageal Cancer Patients

September 7, 2017

via Allegheny Health Network

Immunotherapy drugs such as nivolumab (Opdivo) have given new hope to lung cancer and melanoma patients, some of whom are seeing remarkable response rates with the new therapies. However, progress has been slow for other cancers, including one of the deadliest, esophageal cancer.

Now, in research just published in Annals of Surgery, cancer specialists at Allegheny Health Network’s Esophageal and Lung Institute and the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins have looked at how the immune microenvironment changes during standard chemotherapy and radiation treatment in tissue samples from 31 esophageal cancer patients and a rat model of the disease to shed light on how immunotherapy drugs like nivolumab may help patients with esophageal cancer.

“As physicians who care for patients with esophageal cancer, we are continually working to find new ways to prevent and treat this aggressive cancer,” said Blair Jobe, MD, Chair of the Esophageal and Lung Institute at Allegheny Health Network and one of the principal investigators in the study. “We believe our findings could have significant implications for the treatment of esophageal cancer patients.”

Blair Jobe, MD and Ali Zaidi, MD, Director of Research at AHN’s Esophageal and Lung Institute led the research along with Ronan Kelly, MD, MBA, associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. Other AHN researchers included E. Day Werts, PhD., radiation biologist, Division of Radiation Oncology, and Jan Silverman, MD, Chair of Pathology at AHN.

Among tissue samples of esophageal cancer patients treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation, the scientists report statistically significant increases of between nearly 20 and 30 percent of the expression of proteins such as PD-L1 and CTLA-4, which are involved in regulating tumor responses to immune system cells. They also found an increase in the number of T-cells, the soldiers of the immune system, within tumor tissue samples after the patients were treated with chemo and radiation, compared with before their treatment.

In a study of 22 rats which are bred to develop acid reflux disease and subsequent esophageal cancers, the scientists treated 10 of the rats with nine weeks of a lower dose of radiation and 12 rats with a higher dose. Among the esophageal tumors removed from the rats, the scientists found up to twice the levels of PD-L1 expression the within the tumors treated with higher doses of radiation than those that received lower doses. However, because of the small sample size of rats, the changes in protein expression levels was not considered statistically significant. What the scientists did find, though, was that the expression levels were highest immediately after radiation treatment and leveled off as time went on.

“If we continue to find that radiation causes immunologic changes in tumors, we can test whether drugs that target the immune system are able to drive more cancer-killing T-cells into the tumor,” says Kelly. The investigators hope that the human body’s dormant immune defenses can be tricked into recognizing and killing esophageal cancer cells when combined with chemo-radiation.

“Esophageal cancer is a deadly disease that even when detected early is fatal in the majority of patients. Chances of spreading throughout the body are extremely high even in patients where it is diagnosed early and resected. Therefore, newer ways are required to treat this deadly disease in real-time.” says Ali Zaidi MD, Director Research at Esophageal and Lung Institute.

The scientists at AHN and Johns Hopkins are conducting a clinical trial to test the safety and effectiveness of adding immunotherapy to standard chemotherapy and radiation in patients with esophageal cancer.

For more information, please visit: ahn.org

To read more esophageal cancer news, please visit: SALGI.org/news

Follow The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation on Facebook: Facebook.com/SalgiFoundation

 

Story Source:

Materials above provided by Allegheny Health Network.  Editor Note: Content may be edited.

 

 

 

Disclaimer

This post contains information provided by a press release from authors of the highlighted abstracts and reflects the content of those abstracts. It does not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation who cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of the data.


Outcomes Favor Laparoscopic Surgery for Lower to Mid Esophageal Cancer, Study Shows

September 6, 2017

Patients requiring surgery for esophageal cancer fare better after undergoing a hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy (HMIO) compared to an open esophagectomy (OO), according to long-term results of the MIRO trial to be presented at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid.

Mature results of the phase 3 study, with follow-up to a median of 48.8 months, demonstrate that the reduced surgical trauma associated with a laparoscopic approach, does not cut corners on safety, said investigator Dr. Guillaume Piessen, from University Hospital C. Huriez, Lille, France.

“In addition to a 69% reduction in major intra- and postoperative morbidity, three-year overall survival was improved in the laparoscopic group, showing that it is an oncologically sound procedure,” Piessen said.

While the survival difference between groups was not statistically significant, he called it “highly clinically relevant.”

MIRO enrolled 207 adult patients from 13 centers with resectable cancers of the middle or lower third of the esophagus.

They were randomized to undergo either HMIO or an OO.

At 30-days, major postoperative morbidity occurred in significantly fewer patients in the HMIO compared to the OO group (35.9% versus 64.4%, odds ratio [OR] 0.31, 95%CI 0.18-0.55; p<0·001).

At three years, there was also a trend in the HMIO group towards improved overall survival and disease-free survival (67.0% versus 55%, p=0.05 and 57% versus 48%, p=0.15).

Commenting on the trial, Prof. Ulrich Güller, from Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Switzerland said: “This represents an extremely important, well-designed and well-conducted study demonstrating that HMIO is an oncologically sound procedure and significantly reduces postoperative morbidity. Based on these results, the HMIO should become the new standard operating procedure for patients with mid and low [esophageal] cancer.”

Güller added, “I think it is key to mention Prof. Christophe Mariette, the first author of this important trial, who sadly passed away one month ago. Prof. Mariette was a model of a surgical scientist and an opinion leader in the field, and his contribution to the MIRO trial was of cardinal importance.”

To read more esophageal cancer news, please visit: SALGI.org/news

Follow The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation on Facebook: Facebook.com/SalgiFoundation

 

Story Source:

Materials above provided by European Society For Medical Oncology (ESMO).  Editor Note: Content may be edited.

 

References

  1. Abstract 615O_PR ‘Hybrid Minimally Invasive vs. Open Esophagectomy for patients with Esophageal Cancer: Long-term outcomes of a multicentre, open-label, randomized phase III controlled trial, the MIRO trial” will be presented by Dr Guillaume Piessen during Proffered Paper Session ‘Gastrointestinal tumours, non-colorectal 1’ on Friday, 8 September 2017, 14:00 to 15:30 (CEST) in Barcelona Auditorium.

 

Disclaimer

This post contains information provided by a press release from authors of the highlighted abstracts and reflects the content of those abstracts. It does not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation who cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of the data.


Rhode Island Esophageal Cancer Support Group

August 14, 2017

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation will host the first support group for esophageal cancer in Rhode Island.

The support group will be held on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 from 6:00 – 7:00 PM.

Registration is required.  To register, please contact us:

The group will meet at the Holy Ghost Church hall located in the basement.  The address is: 472 Atwells Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island 02909.

The support group is available for everyone who has been affected by esophageal cancer. Those currently undergoing treatment and survivors. Family members are also welcome.

 


Kendra Scott Fundraising Event in Chicago, IL benefiting The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation

August 2, 2017

Join us for a fundraising event on Saturday, August 5th from 1-3 PM at Kendra Scott Soutport in Chicago to raise money for esophageal cancer awareness and research efforts! 20% of all proceeds will benefit The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation. Enjoy sips, sweets and jewels!

Kendra Scott Southport

3426 N Southport Avenue

Chicago, Illinois

Not going to be in Chicago that day, but want to participate? Not a problem! You can place a phone order starting August 2nd up until Saturday, August 5th. The phone number is 708-669-0230.

Together we can raise awareness, and get one step closer to ending esophageal cancer once and for all!

Please help us make this a great success by sharing this event on Facebook, click here, and share the image below on Instagram! Tag us in your posts @SalgiFoundation.  Thank you!

 


Thank you! Rhode Island’s 6th Annual Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run

June 22, 2017

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation hosted the 6th Annual Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run on Saturday, June 17, 2017 at Warwick City Park.  The annual events aim to raise awareness and funding for esophageal cancer advocacy and research.

We would like to thank everyone who helped make Rhode Island’s 6th Annual Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run a great success!  Thank you to all of the walkers, runners, sponsors, volunteers and donors! We look forward to more events in the future to further this mission in support of awareness, early detection and research funding for esophageal cancer!

  

Due to the success of previous fundraising events, The Salgi Foundation was able to award esophageal cancer research funding for the very first time in July 2015!  This goal was achieved in less than five years since the charity first founded.  This research was accepted by the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute Council and was presented as a poster presentation during Digestive Disease Week (DDW) held in Chicago, IL in May, 2017.  While this was a major accomplishment, there is still so much more work that needs to be done and worthy research that needs to be funded.

Volunteers are needed for the 2018 event.  Please contact us for information! SALGI.org/volunteer

Visit our Facebook page to view photos from the event.  Please feel free to tag! …and remember to “like” and “share” our page!  Thank you Kimberli Photography for taking photos of the event! Visit her website: KimberliPhoto.com

Visit our YouTube channel to view the video from the event.  Please remember to subscribe and share!

Thank you to Eric Simmons for taking the time to create this video! Visit his website: Grrrmedia.com

 

 

 

Thank you Sponsors!

Periwinkle Sponsor: General Dynamics Electric Boat- 6th Annual Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run- The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation

Periwinkle Sponsor: General Dynamics Electric Boat

Silver Sponsor: Balise Toyota of Warwick

 

Thank you In-Kind Donors

Wholesome! | Enjoy Life Foods | PriceRite | Zevia | Jersey Mike’s Subs | Massage Envy | Lundberg Family Farms | Gaia Herbs | Kimberli Photography | Raw Elements USA | Oregon Chai | Pretzel Crisps | WEEI 103.7FM Providence | Dave & Buster’s | Launch RI | Starbucks | Dave’s Marketplace | BJ’s Wholesale Club | Trader Joe’s | Glutino | Shaw’s


ONE Month Away! Rhode Island’s 6th Annual Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run

May 17, 2017

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation will host the 6th Annual Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run on Saturday, June 17th, at Warwick City Park in Warwick, Rhode Island at 10 AM.  The event aims to raise awareness and funding for esophageal cancer advocacy and research.  Sign up today! salgiwalkrun2017.eventbrite.com.

Periwinkle sponsor for the 6th Annual Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run is General Dynamics Electric Boat.

Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 the day of; children 12 and under and dogs are admitted free! T-shirts are available only for pre-paid guests who have registered by Friday, May 26th, 2017.  Guests may sign up individually or as a team.  To register or for more information, please visit: salgiwalkrun2017.eventbrite.com.

Those who are unable to attend the event but would still like to donate may visit: SALGI.org/donate.

Guests and supporters may create a personalized online fundraising page to help The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation make an even bigger impact.  Registration is not required to create a fundraising page.  Please visit: Crowdrise.com/EsophagealCancer2017.

Sponsorship opportunities are still available for the 6th Annual Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run.  Click here to learn more.

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation awarded its first-ever grant to esophageal cancer research in July, 2017.   This research was accepted by the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute Council and an abstract was presented during Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2017.

Since The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation first funded research in 2015, over 20 investigators have inquired about their funding program.  The charity is working diligently in hopes of funding more research within the next year.

About Esophageal Cancer:  Acid reflux disease is one of the primary risk factors associated with esophageal cancer.  Chronic heartburn, obesity, poor nutrition, tobacco use and excessive alcohol use are all risk factors.   Esophageal cancer is among the fastest growing and deadliest cancers in the United States.  With over a 600% increase in the past decades, the overall five-year survival rate is only 18.4%.

There are no standard or routine screenings to detect esophageal cancer in its earlier stages. Symptoms, such as difficulty swallowing, typically appear once the cancer has become advanced.  Despite its rapid increase and poor prognosis, esophageal cancer receives very little awareness and research funding.

Please join The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation in making this event a great success.  Visit, like and share our Facebook page and invite your friends to do so as well!  https://www.facebook.com/SalgiFoundation