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Fundraising Update: Running For Maki

November 6, 2019

On Sunday, November 3, 2019, Daniel ran his very first marathon, The New York City Marathon, in memory of his mother-in-law, Makiko Moni, who passed away from esophageal cancer.

Daniel created an online fundraising page to honor his mother-in-law and to raise awareness of esophageal cancer and funding for research.  The fundraiser “Running for Maki” has been a great success, with Daniel raising over $6,700 (and counting)!

Daniel also finished the race in 4:41 time and said that “knowing I was running on behalf of my mother-in-law, all of the donors and Salgi really kept me going, especially late in the race.”  Makiko passed away from esophageal cancer earlier this year (2019).

We are honored to carry out this mission in Makiko’s memory and are extremely appreciative to Daniel and all who supported his fundraiser.  To check out his campaign, click here.

Visit our Facebook page to view more photos from race day! Click here

Learn the facts: Esophageal cancer is considered one of the fastest growing and deadliest cancer in the United States and western world.  Esophageal cancer has increased over 700% in the past three decades and has an overall 5 year survival rate of only 19.2%.

There are no routine or standard screenings to improve early detection of esophageal cancer and symptoms often arise late, once the cancer is considered advanced or “distant” (spread to lymph nodes and other organs.) Stage IV esophageal cancer has a survival rate of only 4.8%.

Despite these facts, esophageal cancer research is extremely underfunded.  In 2015, The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation awarded esophageal cancer research funding for the very first time. Then, in November, 2018, we have once again awarded funding for esophageal cancer research. Both grants were given in honor of all the men and women affected by esophageal cancer.

If you would like to create a fundraiser, please visit: charity.gofundme.com/esophagealcancer

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The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation Named “2019 Top-Rated Nonprofit” by GreatNonprofits

November 2, 2019

Thanks to our wonderful supporters, The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation has been named one of the first winners of a 2019 Top-Rated Award from GreatNonprofits!

We appreciate everyone who took the time to add a review! Read inspiring stories about us and add your own review. Click here: greatnonprofits.org/org/salgi-esophageal-cancer-research-foundation

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation is proud of our accomplishments within the past several years, including awarding esophageal cancer research grants in both 2015 and in 2018; twice in less than seven years since our charity was founded.

With the help of our supporters and donors, we have also raised raise awareness, advocated for early detection and hosted esophageal cancer awareness events in Rhode Island, Missouri, Colorado, Ohio, Kentucky, New York City, Massachusetts, Virginia, Maine, New Jersey and Illinois, with additional locations currently in the planning stages. These events gave rise to chapters in St. Louis, Missouri; Arvada, Colorado and Brooklyn, New York.

The Top-Rated Nonprofit Award is the based on the rating and number of reviews The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation received from volunteers, donors and supporters. “Salgi is a charity dedicated to the cure of a horrible disease. The group promotes awareness in an informative and professional manner Salgi is run by dedicated and caring people,” one supporter posted.

“The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation is a great example of a nonprofit making a real difference in their community,” said Perla Ni, CEO of GreatNonprofits, “Their award is well-deserved recognition not only of their work, but the tremendous support they receive, as shown by the many outstanding reviews they have received from people who have direct experience working with The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation.”

GreatNonprofits is the leading website where people share stories about their personal experiences on more than 1.6 million charities and nonprofits. The GreatNonprofits Top-Rated Awards are the only awards for nonprofits determined by those who have direct experience with the charities – as donors, volunteers and recipients of aid.

The complete list of 2019 Top Rated Nonprofits can be found at: https://greatnonprofits.org/awards/browse/Campaign:Year2019/Issue:All/Page:1

To read The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation’s reviews, and to post your own, visit: greatnonprofits.org/org/salgi-esophageal-cancer-research-foundation

 

 

 

 

 

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Survivor Story: Ignored Warning Signs Eventually Leads to Esophageal Cancer Diagnosis

November 2, 2019

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation is honored to share the following story of Todd C, an esophageal cancer survivor, whose story is very similar to many others who have been diagnosed.

For many, what seems to be irritating yet seemingly insignificant symptoms of recurrent indigestion, heartburn, burning in chest, difficulty eating or swallowing, etcetera are really warning signs of esophageal cancer.   If you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms or may have one or more risk factors, please speak to your doctor about a referral to a gastroenterologist for screening.

We are very grateful to Todd for sharing his story and we hope that his story will not only help in our quest to raise awareness of esophageal cancer, the critical importance of earliest possible detection but it will also offer hope for those who are experiencing a diagnosis for themselves or for a loved one.

While esophageal cancer does often highlight poor statistics attributed to it due to low survival rates, we are always inspired to share stories of survivorship as testament to the fact that esophageal cancer can be beat.  With awareness, early detection and research, our charity is working to not only improve survival rates, but to make esophageal cancer history.

Thank you, Todd for sharing your story!

 

Todd C., Survivor, Diagnosed in October 1988:

“Every year about this time I find myself in awe that I have been blessed with another year. You see it was the first week of October 1998 that I was diagnosed with Stage III esophageal cancer.

Really, I had few symptoms, a little indigestion, nothing exceptional. Sometimes when I would eat there would be pain directly behind my breastbone when I would swallow, but it would be fleeting and manageable. My wife upon a visit to our family doctor with one of our children, mentioned my symptoms to our doctor who advised her that I should get scoped. When she shared this with me, I of course blew it off as nothing and didn’t think any more about it.

A month or so passed, one day I received a call from our family doctor asking me if I had made an appointment to get scoped yet, I replied that I had not. He encouraged me to do so, and to do it sooner rather than later. I remember hanging up the phone and thinking that it was quite odd to get a call from our doctor, he really wasn’t an alarmist and I didn’t really have that close of a relationship with him. Still, I ignored his advice.

One day while walking into work I was eating a banana while crossing the parking lot. I took a bite, chewed and swallowed, stopping me immediately in my tracks. I couldn’t breathe in or out, and it felt as if someone had stuck a knife in my chest. I waited slightly hunched over for the pain to ease and to be able to take a breath again, and as in the past, this did occur, and I went on about my day thinking that it was going to be a rough one. Again, I chose to ignore the warning sign.

I was 6’2” and weighed roughly 240 lbs. solid, an ole farm boy. I loved to work, and I loved to eat, but for some reason I found myself changing my diet, almost without even realizing it until I had lost about 30 pounds in a one-month period.  I found myself down to about 210 lbs. and told everyone around me how easy it was to lose weight.  Why I had simply made a few changes in my diet and look, I dropped 30 pounds in a month.

It was at that point that I started to put all the pieces together, the pain, the heartburn, my doctors concern to a point where he contacted me, the unintentional diet change, and of course the weight loss. I decided it was time to get checked. It had been about 4 months since my wife had made the initial statement to our family doctor about my symptoms.

I was referred to a wonderful gastrointestinal doctor and on the day of my scope I asked him what exactly we were going to do. He explained the procedure and added that he really didn’t expect to see anything alarming, but if he did, he might biopsy it. Upon completing the scope he told me that I had some irritation and bleeding in my esophagus right at the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) where the stomach and esophagus come together, and because of that he did take some biopsies, but did not expect them to be anything.

Three days after my scope, I received a call at work from my doctor. He explained that he had received the report on my biopsies and that it came back “suspicious”. I asked suspicious of what and he stated that I had cancer. I asked what I needed to do. He said I would need at minimum a surgery and I told him that he was a surgeon and I liked him so okay.

His reply was NO. I said “oh, you don’t do that kind of surgery”, and he assured me that he did, but he would not do mine. I asked why, and he told me that at 36 years old I needed the best of the best and he was not it. He went on to inform me that there were doctors in the area that would do it, but not to let them. Obviously at this point I realized the gravity of my condition.

I ended up at case Western University Hospital in Cleveland, Ohio in the hands of some wonderful doctors, Dr. John Murphy, now retired, Dr. Judy Clayman now retired, and Dr. Amitah Chak, still there and an absolutely fantastic individual.

I completed 5 weeks of radiation, a Gastroesophagectomy via Ivors-Lewis pull up method, followed by 6 months of chemotherapy with Cisplatin and 5FU. I had 5 lymph nodes in my chest that were removed, come back positive, but no (metastasis) METs to any other organs.

There are many, many details, concerns, scares, etc. along the journey that I began in that first week in October of 1998. But I am here, I am healthy, I live a very, very full life. I work at my job 50+ hours a week. I have horses, and donkeys, and other livestock that I care for at home. My wife and I enjoy travelling and life is good.

There are still side effects, and life changes that I live with today, but nothing that can’t be managed.

I don’t know why I have been fortunate enough to survive this devastating disease. I have not made the best lifestyle choices along the way every time, but for whatever reason I am good.

A cancer diagnosis, no matter how bleak, is not a death sentence. I am proof of that. I am grateful to have had fantastic doctors, a wonderful wife, and incredible support team.

My fervent hope is that research can come up with the answers and cures to prevent others from having to take the path that I had to go down.”

 

 


 

To read more Personal Stories of Esophageal Cancer, please click here.

Follow The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation on Facebook: Facebook.com/SalgiFoundation

Get your copy of our Free ebook: ‘Esophageal Cancer Survivor Stories.” smashwords.com/books/view/881856

 


Fundraising Spotlight: Running for Maki

October 18, 2019

For his very first marathon, Daniel will be running in memory of his mother-in-law, Makiko Moni who passed away from esophageal cancer.  Daniel has created an online fundraising page to help raise funding for esophageal cancer research.  With less than one month until race day, we hope you will take a moment to read Daniel’s story, share his campaign and consider supporting his efforts through a donation.   On behalf of The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation, we would like to thank Daniel for bringing awareness to esophageal cancer and raising much needed funds for awareness and research!

 

Daniel’s fundraiser:  Running for Maki

As many of you know, we suffered a great tragedy earlier this year with the passing of my mother-in-law, Makiko Monji.  She was so kind, generous, stylish, talented, loving, and full of life – Maki was truly a special person who was beautiful in every way.  We miss her dearly.  Sadly, she was afflicted with a terrible disease, esophageal cancer, that ended her life far too quickly.

On November 3, 2019, I will be running the New York City Marathon, my first marathon.  I have been training hard and I am proudly dedicating my run to Maki’s memory and life.  She was always so supportive of everyone and inspiring to others – I know she will be with me as I run.

I have decided to use this opportunity to raise money for the Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation in Maki’s honor.  Salgi funds research into methods for early detection and treatment of esophageal cancer, which, unfortunately, is a devastating disease that is often caught too late to be effectively treated.  Esophageal cancer is also one of the fasting growing cancers in the world (600% increase in diagnoses over the last 30 years), but is relatively unknown and is lacking in research funding and awareness among the general public.  Please visit salgi.org for more information regarding esophageal cancer awareness, early detection, and research.

Your support would be greatly appreciated – every contribution will help carry me to the finish line and will go towards the fight against esophageal cancer!

Thank you!

PS:  If you want to track me as I run, my bib number is 32610 (use the New York Road Runners app).  I hope to see you out there on race day!

 

Learn the Facts:

Esophageal cancer is considered one of the fastest growing and deadliest cancer in the United States and western world.  Esophageal cancer has increased over 700% in the past three decades and has an overall 5 year survival rate of only 19.2%.  There are no routine or standard screenings to improve early detection of esophageal cancer and symptoms often arise late, once the cancer is considered advanced or “distant” (spread to lymph nodes and other organs.) Stage IV esophageal cancer has a survival rate of only 4.8%.

Despite these facts, esophageal cancer research is extremely underfunded.  In 2015, The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation awarded esophageal cancer research funding for the very first time. Then, in November, 2018, we have once again awarded funding for esophageal cancer research. Both grants were given in honor of all the men and women affected by esophageal cancer.

 

Click here to visit Daniel’s fundraiser: Running for Maki or visit: https://www.crowdrise.com/o/en/campaign/running-for-makiko/danielhittman


Endoscopy for gastroesophageal reflux disease and survival in esophageal adenocarcinoma

October 11, 2019

This article was posted on MDLinx.com‘s  to view the original article, click here.

 

“In a nationwide cohort study, researchers investigated if survival in esophageal cancer (esophageal adenocarcinoma) (EAC) is influenced by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or endoscopy practice. Participants were all Swedish residents (n = 6,600) (79.3% males, median age 70 years) who received a diagnosis of esophageal cancer (EAC) in 1997-2013 and were followed till 2018. History of GERD and endoscopies before EAC were the exposures. EAC-specific 5-year mortality was assessed as the main outcome. Findings revealed a possible association of GERD with a better prognosis in the event of EAC. However, the limited influence of the use of endoscopy screening on survival was reported unless performed very frequently.” via

Read the full article here: International Journal of Cancer

 

Learn the facts about esophageal cancer

-Esophageal cancer has increased over 700% and is considered one of the fastest growing cancers in the US.*

-Risk factors include:

  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD, acid reflux, chronic heartburn),
  • obesity,
  • poor nutrition,
  • tobacco use,
  • excessive alcohol use,
  • Barrett’s esophagus.

-As one of the deadliest cancers, esophageal cancer has an overall 5 year survival rate of only 19.2%.

-There are no routine or standard screenings to improve early detection of esophageal cancer.

-Symptoms often arise late, once the cancer is considered advanced or “distant” (spread to lymph nodes and other organs.)

-Stage IV esophageal cancer has a survival rate of only 4.8%.

-Despite these facts, esophageal cancer research is extremely underfunded.

To make a tax-deductible donation to The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation, please visit: salgi.org/donate

Editor Note:

Content may be edited.

Disclaimer

This post contains information from an article regarding recently published research and reflects the content of that research.  It does not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation who cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of the data.


Fundraising Spotlight: Dara’s Esophageal Cancer Awareness Run/Walk in Brooklyn, New York

September 11, 2019

When we first spoke with Dara about hosting an event in New York, we were excited to work together on hosting an event yet heartbroken to hear that her father’s battle with esophageal cancer was similar to our loved ones battle.  It is our hope that this event will bring much attention to the dire need for awareness, prevention, improved and routine screenings, innovative treatments and funding for esophageal cancer research.

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation is honored to present to you our 1st Annual Esophageal Cancer Awareness Run/Walk event to Brooklyn, New York.  The event will take place on Saturday, September 14, 2019 at Marine Park.  The event is being hosted by our lead event coordinator and New York chapter representative, Dara M. and elitefeats.  Guests may either walk or run and can sign up online by Friday, September 13, 2019 at 5 PM EST.  Volunteers are also welcome.   Click here for more information and to sign up!

Here is Dara’s story:

 

Our Battle Against Esophageal Cancer: Joe’s Journey

“For many people, indigestion, acid reflux, GERD and heartburn are ailments that can be treated with common over-the-counter medications. More severe cases of gastroesophageal reflux might require stronger drugs that can be prescribed by a doctor for as long as symptoms persist.

This was how my father, Joseph M., began his battle with esophageal cancer.

Even though my dad was a smoker and drank when he was younger, there were no signs or symptoms of any complications until ten years after he’d been working at a print shop in Queens, New York. Exposed to paint thinners, chemicals and other toxic fumes that emitted from heavy machinery at work, he came home every day wreaking of industrial substances.

His heartburn began around 2005 and was a mild nuisance, which he solved by devouring dozens of boxes of Tums every week. When he went to the doctor a couple of years later to complain of more painful indigestion, as his diet began to change because he couldn’t eat spicy foods or enjoy pasta sauce the way he used to, they prescribed pills like Nexium to quell the stomach acid and discomfort.

We thought his chronic heartburn would simply need continuous medication until the afternoon of Fourth of July in 2008, when we were in the city and on our way to see the Macy’s Fireworks display – a father/daughter tradition we had for several years. We went to a delicious chicken place that had some awesome cornbread! It seemed to happen so abruptly – as my father was in the middle of eating, food suddenly became lodged in his esophagus. We didn’t know it was even possible for food to get “stuck” in this digestive tract, but he couldn’t get water or any food to flow down to his stomach.

Suffice to say, our father-daughter day was cut short as we left the city and he tried to push the food down with more water, which only worked for so long. Eventually, the food that was lodged in his esophagus slowly dissolved and the scare of seeing my father not being able to eat was only part of the problem.

Another trip to the doctor – and explaining to a gastroenterologist what happened – seemed to rip open another bag of unwanted surprises. The blur began as my father was given appointments with specialists months after that Fourth of July incident.  X-rays showed that there was some type of obstruction and tissue inflammation in his esophagus.  By September or so, doctors finally ordered my dad to have an endoscopy so they could biopsy the cells.

There were all sorts of words and medical terms thrown around as my dad was scrutinizing and amending his diet – Barrett’s esophagus, esophagectomy…but I will never forget the day we met with a surgeon who followed up on the gastroenterologists findings. The day they told us my father had esophageal cancer. My reaction to this years later remains a numbing haze, even though I recall wondering what this disease was! I knew cancerous cells could develop anywhere in the body, but this heartbreaking news led to a slew of nightmares that me, my dad and I’m sure thousands of other families have had to experience after initial diagnosis.

At first, doctors recommended chemotherapy and radiation to shrink the cells and advised us that surgery was a last resort to remove the cancer and any infected lymph nodes. Before my dad’s chemo and radiation even began, his oncologist recommended my dad have a port-a-cath – or chemo port – placed in his chest to administer medications and blood tests. I will never forget how my dad went in for what was supposed to be a simple outpatient procedure the week of Thanksgiving for the chemo port but instead, as the doctors were inserting it into his body, the tube punctured his lungs.  Not only did he miss Thanksgiving of 2008 because his left lung had collapsed, his chemo/radiation treatments were set back by a few weeks as he recovered from the painful blow.

As many cancer patients experience, my dad endured rough chemotherapy treatments and his appetite – along with the cancer – was very slowly shrinking. He was ordered to have endoscopies every few months, which became a scary routine to prep for and recover from. We were told his cancer was in Stage 3 and that there was a chance he’d fight it – even after it seemed to go into remission for a couple of months in summer of 2009.

The hardest part of seeing a loved one suffer as they battle esophageal cancer is knowing that they can’t eat normally, even after rounds of chemo and radiation. Their diets completely change – if they can manage to eat at all – and losing weight becomes a major concern, as they’re not able to take in the nutrients the body needs to function. Drinking nutrition shakes and supplements was also sickening at some point.

Sadly, in early 2010, my father found that the cancer cells had returned. We also returned to the idea of surgery. This would ultimately involve, as the oncologist told us in detail, having part of the esophagus removed and surgeons pulling up and rebuilding a portion of the stomach. This invasive procedure would be two-pronged. Yes, it would essentially remove the central portion of the cancer and some lymph nodes, but there was also the risk of the cancer spreading post-surgery.

One of the worst aspects of having an esophagectomy, as I’ve heard from others with the same experiences, is not being able to eat for weeks or months after the surgery. If my dad opted for the surgery, he would have had to use a feeding tube for a long time and the recovery from the procedure would have possibly been ten times worse than continuing short-term treatment.

My father looked to me for direction – continue with chemo or go under the knife? I couldn’t honestly bear to see my dad having any more invasive procedures and by spring 2010, he painstakingly asked me to enroll him in a hospice program. What drove the knife through my heart was knowing he didn’t want to die and he didn’t want to become a statistic of a cancer that neither of us had ever heard of until 2 years before when he was diagnosed.

It was during this time, as my dad was provided with heavy medications at home, that I began looking up esophageal cancer on social media. I started reading other families’ experiences and diagnosis. It was truly unbelievable to me that all of us experienced this same journey – many only lasting 2-3 years before the battle became too much to handle nutritionally, mentally, physically, emotionally and medically. A lucky handful were able to say they were survivors after surgery.

Every story I’d read, and still read today, is filled with shock at how insurance companies refuse to cover some of the tests for esophageal cancer in its early stages. And then I question, can this cancer be caught early enough somehow to prevent or slow down cells from becoming cancerous? Are doctors ignoring the serious warning signs and pushing pills like they did to my dad before that doomed day which changed our lives?

1st Annual Esophageal Cancer Awareness Run NYC New York City Brooklyn The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research FoundationMy family got the call on October 16, 2010, a little over 12 hours after we had to place my father in a facility for hospice. I was only thankful that he wasn’t suffering anymore and he wasn’t fighting to stay alive.

Over the past few years, as I looked back on my father’s battle, I became a runner and subsequently found that it was rewarding to participate in 5K races for a good cause. I’d run races bringing awareness to ovarian cancer, another disease for which there is no screening, as well as testicular cancer.

However, after much research, I’d discovered there was little attention brought to any events focusing on esophageal cancer in New York City. With a growing number of New Yorkers being exposed to toxic fumes and work conditions, no matter how healthy their lifestyles are, I was surprised to find that no one was sponsoring an event to bring this complex cancer to the forefront of the public.

As I continued to read stories about those whose lives were taken by esophageal cancer, I noticed the trends in diagnosis, treatment and lack of awareness/education. Finally deciding that I wanted to help spread the word to more people in my city and give others tools to recognize their own health conditions, I scoped out an organization that could assist with my new mission.

I came across the Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation on social media and started 2019 with a simple phone conversation with the organization’s Executive Director, Christina. We also shared the same experience, as she explained the passing of her grandfather came after a similar struggle I’d gone through with my father.

With no races/walks, fundraisers or awareness events in my city aimed at esophageal, I proposed we host an event in Brooklyn to bring light to the lesser-known cancer. After a little more research, I decided it would be a great idea to find a race organization to provide the provisions for the event. Working out the details with elitefeats, a race organization I’m quite familiar with, helped bring the mission to life.

Fundraising for esophageal cancer awareness is more than just about coming to our event in September and running for a cure. Through sponsorship and dedication to spreading the word, my ultimate goal is to provide others with tools to make themselves and their loved ones more vigilant when it comes to their digestive health.

The “Esophageal Cancer Awareness Run/Walk NYC” will serve as a resourceful awakening for many New Yorkers who aren’t familiar with this disease. I’m also hoping it will somehow reach medical experts and specialists who often brush off those signs or are hesitant to diagnose something that can become more serious.

Stories like my dads are becoming more and more common and it doesn’t get any easier to recall the way his life ended. My passion now is to keep his memory alive by hosting this fundraiser that will hopefully help others write a different story in years to come.”

 

 

To sign up for our Esophageal Cancer Awareness Run/Walk NYC please visit: https://events.elitefeats.com/september-2019-esophageal-cancer-5k

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ASGE Releases Update Guideline on Screening and Surveillance of Barrett’s Esophagus

September 6, 2019

The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has released its updated “ASGE guideline on screening and surveillance of Barrett’s esophagus,” published in the September issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

The guideline aims to help clinicians understand the published literature and quality of available data on screening and surveillance in patients with Barrett’s esophagus; a precancerous condition for esophageal cancer (adenocarcinoma.)  This document addresses several key clinical issues in this field, including the role and impact of screening and surveillance of Barrett’s esophagus. As with other types of cancer, identifying this precancerous condition and early changes of cancer provides the best chance of successful treatment and, ultimately, improves patient outcomes.

Several endoscopic procedures and related technologies are used to screen and monitor patients with known or suspected Barrett’s esophagus. If changes are found in the cells lining the esophagus, various endoscopic treatment approaches are available.

This guideline addresses the utility of advanced imaging and sampling modalities used during screening and surveillance endoscopic procedures and includes chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, wide-area transepithelial sampling (WATS) and others. Table 4 contains a summary of the recommendations.

The document complies with the standards of guideline development set forth by the Institute of Medicine for the creation of trustworthy guidelines and provides recommendations based on the GRADE framework.

“We are hopeful that this current information will help guide clinicians in using the growing array of tools and technologies available to us to diagnose and manage Barrett’s esophagus, which, in turn, has the potential to significantly impact patient outcomes,” said Sachin Wani, MD, FASGE, Chair of the ASGE Standards of Practice Committee.

The full guideline is available here.

Barrett’s esophagus is one possible risk factor associated with esophageal cancer, which is one of the fastest growing and deadliest cancers in the United States.  There are no routine screenings to detect esophageal cancer in earlier stages and symptoms (such as difficulty swallowing, choking sensation, etc…) often occur once the cancer spreads and becomes more difficult (if not impossible) to treat.

Learn the facts about esophageal cancer

-Esophageal cancer has increased over 700% and is considered one of the fastest growing cancer in the US.*

-Risk factors include:

  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD, acid reflux, chronic heartburn),
  • obesity,
  • poor nutrition,
  • tobacco use,
  • excessive alcohol use,
  • Barrett’s esophagus.

-As one of the deadliest cancers, esophageal cancer has an overall 5 year survival rate of only 19.2%.

-There are no routine or standard screenings to improve early detection of esophageal cancer.

-Symptoms often arise late, once the cancer is considered advanced or “distant” (spread to lymph nodes and other organs.)

-Stage IV esophageal cancer has a survival rate of only 4.8%.

-Despite these facts, esophageal cancer research is extremely underfunded.

To make a tax-deductible donation to The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation, please visit: salgi.org/donate

Materials Provided By:
Journal reference:

Qumseya, B. et al. (2019) ASGE guideline on screening and surveillance of Barrett’s esophagus. Gastrointestinal Endoscopydoi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2019.05.012.

Editor Note:

Content may be edited.

Disclaimer

This post contains information from an article regarding recently published research and reflects the content of that research.  It does not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation who cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of the data.

 

To read more esophageal cancer news, please visit: SALGI.org/news

Follow The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation on Facebook: Facebook.com/SalgiFoundation