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Can Statin Use After Diagnosis of Esophageal Cancer Prolong Survival? (AGA Journals)

March 29, 2016

via: journalsblog.gastro.org

“Statin use after a diagnosis of esophageal adenocarcinoma, but not esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, reduces esophageal cancer–specific and all-cause mortality, researchers report in the April issue of Gastroenterology.

Esophageal cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer-related death in men and eighth most common cause in women, worldwide. Esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) are the most common histologic subtype worldwide, but the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased rapidly since the 1970s and the most common form in the West. Fewer than 20% of patients with esophageal cancer survive for 5 years.

Statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are cholesterol-lowering drugs that have also been reported to have anti-cancer effects. Statin use after diagnosis has been associated with a reduced risk of cancer-specific mortality in from prostate, breast, and colorectal carcinomas. Statins were also found to reduce risk of liver cancer.

Statin use has been inversely associated with the development of the histologic subtypes of esophageal cancers. However, it is not clear whether statin use after a diagnosis of esophageal cancer prolongs survival, or has different effects on EAC vs ESCC.

Leo Alexandre et al sought to determine whether statin use after a diagnosis of esophageal cancer reduced cancer-specific and all-cause mortality in a large cohort (4445 men and women) in the United Kingdom. They collected their data from the United Kingdom General Practice Research database, the UK National Cancer Registry, and the Office of National Statistics database.”

To read more about the findings, visit: journalsblog.gastro.org

 

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University of Louisville researchers find association between oral bacteria and esophageal cancer (ECSS)

March 3, 2016

Via: Kyforward.com

Louisville, KY– “University of Louisville School of Dentistry researchers have found a bacterial species responsible for gum disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis, is present in 61 percent of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).

The findings, published recently in Infectious Agents and Cancer, only detected P. gingivalis in 12 percent of tissues adjacent to the cancerous cells, while this organism was undetected in normal esophageal tissue.

“These findings provide the first direct evidence that P. gingivalis infection could be a novel risk factor for ESCC, and may also serve as a prognostic biomarker for this type of cancer,” said Huizhi Wang, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of oral immunology and infectious diseases at the UofL School of Dentistry. “These data, if confirmed, indicate that eradication of a common oral pathogen may contribute to a reduction in the significant number of people suffering with ESCC.”

UofL School of Dentistry researchers Jan Potempa, David A. Scott, Richard J. Lamont and Huizhi Wang  (UofL Photo)

UofL School of Dentistry researchers Jan Potempa, David A. Scott, Richard J. Lamont and Huizhi Wang (UofL Photo)

The esophagus, a muscular tube critical to the movement of food from the mouth to the stomach, is lined with two main kinds of cells, thus there are two main types of esophageal cancer: adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The latter is more common in developing countries.

In collaboration with the College of Clinical Medicine of Henan University of Science and Technology in Luoyang, China, Wang and his UofL colleagues Richard J. Lamont, Ph.D., Jan Potempa, Ph.D., D.Sc., and David A. Scott, Ph.D., tested tissue samples from 100 patients with ESCC and 30 normal controls.”

To read more about the findings from the research team at UofL School of Dentistry, click here.


“Nurse-led walk-and-eat intervention may improve outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer”

September 14, 2015

Article via Oncologynurseadvisor.com | September 11, 2015

A nurse-led walk-and-eat intervention is feasible and effective to preserve functional walking capacity and nutritional status in patients with esophageal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, according to a recent study published in the journal The Oncologist.

For the study, researchers at National Taiwan University in Taipei, Taiwan, sought to evaluate the impact of a walk-and-eat intervention in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer stage 2B or higher receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. A total of 59 participants were randomly assigned to receive the intervention, which involved nurse-supervised walking 3 times per week and weekly nutritional advice, or usual care during 4 to 5 weeks of chemoradiotherapy.

Results showed that those who received the intervention had a 100-meter less decline in walk distance than control patients, 3-kg less decrease in hand-grip strength, and 2.7-kg less reduction in body weight. Researchers found that the patients’ age did not impact these endpoints.

The study also demonstrated that patients that received the walk-and-eat intervention had significantly lower rates of need for intravenous nutritional support and wheelchair use.

Read the full article: http://www.oncologynurseadvisor.com


Foundation Reaches Milestone: Issues Esophageal Cancer Research Funding For the First Time.

July 28, 2015

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation has issued its first round of funding for esophageal cancer research earlier this month.

The foundation awarded program director, Dr. Carlos Minacapelli and Rutgers Robert Wood Johnston Medical School grant funding.

In 2011, The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation was established to raise awareness, encourage early detection and to fund research of esophageal cancer.  Since 2011, the foundation has both raised awareness and encouraged the importance of earliest possible detection throughout New England, across the United States and internationally.

“The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation is excited to be a part of Dr. Minacapelli’s and Rutger’s research efforts in honor of all the brave men and women who were affected by esophageal cancer and to hopefully reduce incidence and improve outcomes for individuals in the future” President of the foundation stated.

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation would like to thank all of our supporters and donors who believe in this mission and who make these accomplishments possible.  However, this is just the beginning.  We received many other research requests that we were unable to fund at this time.  We need to continue our efforts to fundraise so that we may continue to fund research.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, also known as GERD or acid reflux disease, of which the most common symptom is chronic heartburn, is one of the primary risk factors associated with esophageal cancer.  Other risk factors include obesity, poor nutrition and smoking.  With over a 600% increase in the past decades, esophageal cancer is among the fastest growing and deadliest cancers in the United States and western world.

Currently, there are no standard or routine screenings to detect esophageal cancer in earlier stages. Symptoms, such as difficulty swallowing, typically appear once the cancer has become advanced and the overall five-year survival rate is only 17.5%.  Despite its rapid increase and poor prognosis, esophageal cancer receives very little awareness and research funding.

To make a tax-deductible donation to The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation, please visit: SALGI.org/donate.

 


Obama, complaining of sore throat, diagnosed with acid reflux

December 7, 2014

(Reuters) – President Barack Obama, who had medical tests on Saturday after complaining of a sore throat, is suffering from acid reflux, the president’s physician said.

“The president’s symptoms are consistent with soft tissue inflammation related to acid reflux and will be treated accordingly,” Obama’s doctor, Captain Ronny Jackson, said in a statement.

Acid reflux is a condition in which the stomach contents flow back up from the stomach into the esophagus, causing such symptoms as heartburn and sore throat.

Obama, 53, went to Walter Reed military hospital for a fiber optic exam of his throat and since swelling was detected, doctors decided to perform a CT scan as well, Jackson said.

“The CT scan was conducted this afternoon purely as a matter of convenience for the President’s schedule. The CT scan was normal,” Jackson added.

Jackson said he recommended Obama go to Walter Reed for the tests after the president complained of suffering from a sore throat over the past couple of weeks.

Jackson did not give any cause for Obama’s case of the illness. There are many risk factors for acid reflux, including smoking, use of alcohol and hiatal hernia, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Most people respond to lifestyle changes and medicines, although many patients need to continue on medication to control their symptoms.

Click here to read the full article "Obama, complaining of sore throat, diagnosed with acid reflux" on Reuters.com.

Acid reflux disease, also known as Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease or GERD, is one of the primary risk factors associated with esophageal cancer, the fastest growing cancer in the United States, according to the National Cancer Institute.

It is imperative that people who suffer from heartburn more than twice weekly speak to their doctor.   There are no routine or standard screening tests for esophageal cancer.  Unfortunately, symptoms, such as difficulty swallowing or food getting stuck, typically appear once the cancer has advanced and becomes difficult to treat.

Chronic and severe acid reflux can significantly damage the esophagus.  Not only can it increase the risk of esophageal cancer, but it can lead to other serious health problems, such as ulcers, bleeding and scarring.

Lifestyle changes can help to reduce GERD symptoms.  Click here for some tips to control your acid reflux.

Some medications help to temporarily alleviate GERD symptoms.  However, these medications are typically not intended to be taken for an extended periods of time.  Remember to read the label on these medications and consider the side effects.

Some patients may be candidates for nonsurgical, less invasive options to treat GERD.

As advocates for esophageal health and the prevention of esophageal cancer, we urge everyone suffering from chronic heartburn to consult a medical professional.  Talk to your doctor about your symptoms and options.

 


Support Esophageal Cancer Awareness This #GivingTuesday

December 2, 2014

giving tuesday periwinkle esophageal cancer the salgi esophageal cancer research foundation

Today is Giving Tuesday! The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation is honored to participate in this third annual event.  In 2012, a group of nonprofit professionals decided to create an annual day of giving.  They positioned it around the biggest days of consuming, Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Giving Tuesday opens the giving season and with your help, we will raise funds to spread awareness, encourage early detection and support research of esophageal cancer…in hopes of a cure.™  

How can you help make Giving Tuesday a success?

  • Help us get the word out on social media by visiting and liking our pages: Facebook, Twitter and Instagram;
  • Consider a donation: SALGI.org/donate, as a 501(c)(3) charity, all donations are tax-deductible;
  • Share photos of your loved ones who have been affected by esophageal cancer on social media. Tag us in the photos and we’ll re-post them on our pages;
  • Invite your co-workers, family members and friends to contribute by using the message below via social media or email:

 

I am supporting The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation today on Giving Tuesday and I hope you will, too!  [Optional: Insert personal story/reason for helping.]  Did you know esophageal cancer is the fastest growing cancer in the US, according to the National Cancer Institute? You can support awareness and research efforts by making a tax-deductible donating online: SALGI.org/donate, and by sharing this information with your friends, family and colleagues by email or on Facebook and/or Twitter.  Thank you in advance!

 

Giving Tuesday helps to unite us in the spirit of giving and to bring a spotlight to esophageal cancer, a cause that needs desperate attention.  Let’s make this Giving Tuesday a great success! Thank you in advance for helping to make a difference today and every day.