Kendra Scott Virtual Give Back Event! Dec. 3-4, 2020

November 19, 2020

Kendra Scott is teaming up with The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation for a Virtual Give Back event on December 3- December 4, 2020.

Shop their website and when you checkout, use our special code GIVEBACK-0GCP (the first character is a zero.)

20% of your purchase will be donated to The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation in support of this mission to raise awareness, encourage early detection and to fund research of esophageal cancer!

The code will be live from 12:00am CST on December 3rd to 11:59pm CST on December 4th.
The code needs to be entered at ‘coupon code’ on the billing page (top right) and shoppers must click ‘apply’! A full 20% will be donated!

Please note that some discounts cannot be combined with the giveback code as it would deduct from the donation.  For more information and a step-by-step guide of how to input the code, click here.

 

 


 GERD Awareness Week: November 22-28, 2020

November 18, 2020

“The Dangerous Link Between Chronic Reflux and Esophageal Cancer.”

 

Each year, the week of Thanksgiving is also dedicated to bringing awareness to a growing disease which affects roughly 20% of Americans.  That disease is Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD).

 

Also known as acid reflux disease, GERD is a condition of the digestive system, which has increased significantly in recent decades.  GERD is also a primary risk factor for esophageal cancer, one of the fastest growing and deadliest cancers in the United States. Esophageal cancer, like GERD, has also increased significantly in past decades. In fact, incidence of esophageal cancer has risen over 733% in the past four decades and has only an overall five-year survival rate of approximately 19.9%.

 

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation, a nonprofit, which has funded two grants for esophageal cancer research (one in July, 2015 and another in November, 2018) is working once again to bring awareness of the dangerous link between GERD and esophageal cancer.  While GERD has many symptoms, the most common symptom is heartburn.

 

Heartburn does not typically cause major concern, as billions of Americans experience it at some point in their lives. However, persistent heartburn, which occurs two or more times a week, should not be taken lightly, as it could be a symptom of the disease.

 

President of The Salgi Foundation, Linda Molfesi, said, “my father suffered from chronic heartburn for years and was never warned by doctors of the possible risks. We found out too late, once he started having difficulty swallowing, that his chronic reflux had led to esophageal cancer.” Molfesi continued, “My father passed away a little over a year after he was diagnosed and it was, and still is, devastating.”

 

COVID-19 Impact on Cancer Research published in JAMA Network Open in August, 2020, found that in the past year, the weekly diagnosis for six cancers, of which esophageal cancer is included, fell by almost 50% in the U.S.  This is due to the fact that people have delayed important cancer screenings due to COVID-19.  This is especially concerning for esophageal cancer, which, when caught in advanced stages, is very difficult to treat and has a poor survival rate.

 

As it stands, esophageal cancer has few, if any, early symptoms. Symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, chronic cough or hoarseness, food getting stuck or choking while eating often occur once the cancer has spread and reaches an advanced stage.  There are currently no routine or standard screenings to detect esophageal cancer in its earlier stages.   The foundation is hoping to help change that, awarding $62,597 in November, 2018, to researchers at Virginia Mason Medical Center who are currently developing a breath test for detecting esophageal cancer earlier.

 

Molfesi encourages those who suffer from chronic reflux to be proactive about their health, stating “never ignore frequent heartburn or other symptoms and never rely on medications alone. Talk to your primary care doctor about all of your options, especially how you can get screened for any possible damage.”

 

The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation:  is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit whose mission is to raise awareness, encourage early detection and to fund research of esophageal cancer in hopes of a cure.™  The charity has hosted events in Rhode Island, Missouri, Colorado, Ohio, Kentucky, New York City, Massachusetts, Virginia, Maine, New Jersey and Illinois, with additional locations currently in the planning stages. These events gave rise to chapters in St. Louis, Missouri; Arvada, Colorado and Brooklyn, New York.  For more information, please visit: www.salgi.org

 

 

 

Learn the Facts About Esophageal Cancer:

 

  • No standard or routine screening to detect cancer in earlier stages
  • One of the fastest growing and deadliest cancers in the US and western world
  • Symptoms often arise once the cancer has spread
  • Research receives low government and/or private funding
  • In 2020, estimated 18,440 diagnoses and 16,170 deaths from the cancer.
  • Overall five-year survival rate of less than 19.9%.
  • Stage IV has a survival rate of only 4.8%.

 

 

 

Esophageal Cancer Risk Factors:

 

  • Acid reflux disease-GERD (chronic heartburn)
  • Obesity/overweight
  • Poor nutrition
  • Heavy drinking
  • Tobacco use
  • Barrett’s esophagus

 

 

Common Symptoms of Esophageal Cancer:

 

  • Painful/difficulty swallowing
  • Food getting stuck
  • Weight loss
  • Hoarseness or cough
  • Indigestion/heartburn
  • Pain behind breastbone or pain in back

 

For more information, please visit: SALGI.org/GERD

 

 

esophageal cancer advocacy, esophageal cancer advocate, esophageal cancer research foundation, salgi esophageal cancer research foundation, esophageal cancer research charity, esophageal cancer foundation, esophageal cancer research charity, esophageal cancer, esophageal cancer ri, esophagus cancer, cancer of the esophagus, cancer ri, ri cancer, ri esophageal cancer, cancer treatment, cancer ri treatment, esophageal cancer treatment, esophageal cancer treatment ri, rhode island cancer, cancer rhode island, nonprofit, non profit ri, ri nonprofit, ri non-profit, esophageal non profit, esophagus, barret esophagus, barret esophagus ri, esophagus ri, ri esophagus, esophageal cancer rhode island, gerd, GERD ri, ri gerd, GERD treatment, GERD, GERD help, heartburn, heartburn ri, heartburn treatment, treatment heartburn, acid reflux, acid reflux ri, acid reflux treatment, acid reflux help, ri acid reflux, esophageal cancer, esophageal cancer ri, ri cancer, cancer ri, cancer rhode island, esophageal cancer rhode island, rhode island esophageal cancer, heartburn, acid reflux, gerd, reflux, gerd reflux, acid, pain in chest, doctor ri, gi doctor ri, gastroenterologist ri, ri gastroenterologist, ri health, health ri, esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer treatment, esophageal cancer diagnosis, esophageal cancer research, esophageal cancer donate, esophageal cancer funding, esophageal cancer fund, esophageal cancer funds, esophageal cancer , esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer nonprofit, esophageal cancer events, esophageal cancer rhode island, esophageal cancer new england, esophageal cancer Massachusetts, esophageal cancer screening, esophageal cancer detection, esophageal cancer signs, esophageal cancer symptoms, esophageal cancer diagnosis, esophageal cancer doctors, esophageal cancer doctors in ri, esophageal cancer doctor ri, esophageal cancer symptom, esophageal cancer heartburn, heartburn can cause cancer, cancer heartburn, heartburn cancer, esophageal cancer salgi, esophageal cancer rates, esophageal cancer death, esophageal cancer death rate, esophageal cancer survivors, esophageal cancer survivor, esophageal cancer survivorship, esophageal cancer surviving, esophageal cancer groups, esophageal cancer organizations, esophageal cancer teams, esophageal cancer board, esophageal cancer charity, esophageal cancer nonprofit, esophageal cancer money for research, Networking RI, cancer ri, esophageal cancer, cancer in ri, networking event ri, cancer charity, cancer research, cancer charity ri, cancer research ri, esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer awareness ri, esophageal cancer research ri, esophageal cancer research, esophageal cancer prevention, esophageal cancer prevention ri, esophageal cancer cure, esophageal cancer, in hopes of a cure, networking cancer, cocktails in hopes of a cure, cocktails, Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run, Cancer Walk, Cancer Walk RI, Walk RI, Run RI, Rhode Island Walk, Rhode Island Cancer, Cancer Walks in RI, Cancer Run in RI, Run for charity, Run in RI, cancer run, cancer walk, cancer walk ri, cancer run ri, esophageal cancer, cancer of the esophagus, cancer, esophageal cancer ri, cancer of esophagus, ri cancer, cancer awareness, cancer research, cancer prevention, ri cancer research, ri cancer prevention, ri cancer treatment, ri cancer charity, charity ri, charity, cancer, treat esophageal cancer, treat cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer ri, acid reflux, heartburn can cause cancer, heartburn ri, acid reflux ri, heartburn, heartburn remedy, heartburn remedies, acid reflux remedies, charity run ri, charity walk ri, run for cancer, active, proactive, action, take action, gerd, heartburn and cancer, esophagus heartburn, hurts to swallow, painful swallowing, esophageal cancer, esophageal cancer ri, ri cancer, cancer ri, cancer rhode island, esophageal cancer rhode island, rhode island esophageal cancer, heartburn, acid reflux, gerd, reflux, gerd reflux, acid, pain in chest, doctor ri, gi doctor ri, gastroenterologist ri, ri gastroenterologist, ri health, health ri, esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer treatment, esophageal cancer diagnosis, esophageal cancer research, esophageal cancer donate, esophageal cancer funding, esophageal cancer fund, esophageal cancer funds, esophageal cancer , esophageal cancer awareness, esophageal cancer nonprofit, esophageal cancer events, esophageal cancer rhode island, esophageal cancer new england, esophageal cancer Massachusetts, esophageal cancer screening, esophageal cancer detection, esophageal cancer signs, esophageal cancer symptoms, esophageal cancer diagnosis, esophageal cancer doctors, esophageal cancer doctors in ri, esophageal cancer doctor ri, esophageal cancer symptom, esophageal cancer heartburn, heartburn can cause cancer, cancer heartburn, heartburn cancer, esophageal cancer salgi, esophageal cancer rates, esophageal cancer death, esophageal cancer death rate, esophageal cancer survivors, esophageal cancer survivor, esophageal cancer survivorship, esophageal cancer surviving, esophageal cancer groups, esophageal cancer organizations, esophageal cancer teams, esophageal cancer board, esophageal cancer charity, esophageal cancer nonprofit, esophageal cancer money for research, the salgi foundation, the salgi esophageal cancer research foundation, salgi, salgi foundation, salgi esophageal, salgi esophageal cancer, salgi esophageal cancer research, salgi esophageal cancer research foundation, salgi esophageal foundation, foundation salgi, esophageal cancer awareness salgi, esophageal cancer awareness salgi ri, ri esophageal cancer awareness salgi, ri salgi esophageal cancer, salgi esophageal cancer awareness ri salgi, salgi treatment esophageal cancer, salgi treatment esophageal cancer awareness, salgi treatment esophageal cancer awareness ri, Esophageal Cancer Walk/Run, Cancer Walk, Cancer Walk RI, Walk RI, Run RI, Rhode Island Walk, Rhode Island Cancer, Cancer Walks in RI, Cancer Run in RI, Run for charity, Run in RI, cancer run, cancer walk, cancer walk ri, cancer run ri, esophageal cancer, cancer of the esophagus, cancer, esophageal cancer ri, cancer of esophagus, ri cancer, cancer awareness, cancer research, cancer prevention, ri cancer research, ri cancer prevention, ri cancer treatment, ri cancer charity, charity ri, charity, cancer, treat esophageal cancer, treat cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer, treatment of esophageal cancer ri, acid reflux, heartburn can cause cancer, heartburn ri, acid reflux ri, heartburn, heartburn remedy, heartburn remedies, acid reflux remedies, charity run ri, charity walk ri, run for cancer

 

SOURCES: Harvey W. Kaufman, MD. “Number of US Patients With Newly Identified Cancers Before and During the COVID-19 Pandemic.” JAMA Network Open, JAMA Network, 4 Aug. 2020, jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2768946.

 


Thank you! 2nd Annual Brooklyn, NY Virtual Esophageal Cancer Awareness Run/Walk

September 22, 2020
.
Thank you to all who participated in our 2nd Annual Brooklyn, NY Virtual Esophageal Cancer Awareness Run/Walk event! Thank you to all who signed up, everyone who created a team, everyone who created a fundraiser, and to everyone who donated.
.
To view our video slideshow from the virtual event, please visit: https://youtu.be/0cELKJafP9k
Remember to subscribe to our YouTube Channel!
.
Special thank you to our Lead Event Coordinator and Brooklyn, NY Chapter Representative Dara for all of her hard work and dedication to this cause! In loving memory of her father, Joe!
.

Special thank you to Bronze sponsor: State Senator Andrew Gounardes

State Senator Andrew Gounardes represents New York's 22nd State Senate District

.
Last, but not least, a special thank you to FabKloth Yarns for the fundraiser featuring custom, periwinkle yarns!
.
To all who ran, walked, created a fundraiser or donated, your efforts are supporting this mission to raise awareness, encourage early detection, and to fund research of esophageal cancer.
.
Thank you!
.
.
The Salgi Esophageal Cancer Research Foundation
.
.
.

.

.

#EsophagealCancer #EsophagealCancerAwareness #SalgiRunWalkNYC 💙💜

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

….


The Dangers of Eating Late at Night

November 7, 2014

Dr. Jamie A. Koufman, a physician in New York who specializes in voice disorders and acid reflux, explains how a poor diet and eating late at night can tremendously impact your health and even raise the risk of esophageal cancer.  Dr. Koufman also details ways to help combat acid reflux without taking a pill.

 

The Dangers of Eating Late at Night

ACID REFLUX is an epidemic affecting as many as 40 percent of Americans. In addition to heartburn and indigestion, reflux symptoms may include postnasal drip, hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, chronic throat clearing, coughing and asthma. Taken together, sales of prescribed and over-the-counter anti-reflux medications exceed $13 billion per year.

The number of people with acid reflux has grown significantly in recent decades. Reflux can lead to esophageal cancer, which has increased by about 500 percent since the 1970s. And anti-reflux medication alone does not appear to control reflux disease. A Danish study published this year concluded that there were no cancer-protective effects from using the common anti-reflux medications, called proton pump inhibitors, and that regular long-term use was actually associated with an increased risk of developing esophageal cancer.

What is responsible for these disturbing developments? The answer is our poor diet, with its huge increases in the consumption of sugar, soft drinks, fat and processed foods. But there is another important variable that has been underappreciated and overlooked: our dinnertime.

I specialize in the diagnosis and management of acid reflux, especially airway reflux, which affects the throat, sinuses and lungs. Airway reflux is often “silent,” occurring without telltale digestive symptoms, like heartburn and indigestion. Most of the tens of thousands of reflux patients that I have seen over the last 35 years are well today because I treat reflux by modifying my patients’ diets and lifestyles.

Over the past two decades, I’ve noticed that the time of the evening meal has been trending later and later among my patients. The after-work meal — already later because of longer work hours — is often further delayed by activities such as shopping and exercise.

Typical was the restaurateur who came to see me with symptoms of postnasal drip, sinus disease, hoarseness, heartburn and a chronic cough. He reported that he always left his restaurant at 11 p.m., and after arriving home would eat dinner and then go to bed. There was no medical treatment for this patient, no pills or even surgery to fix his condition. The drugs we are using to treat reflux don’t always work, and even when they do, they can have dangerous side effects. My patient’s reflux was a lifestyle problem. I told him he had to eat dinner before 7 p.m., and not eat at all after work. Within six weeks, his reflux was gone.

In my experience, the single most important intervention is to eliminate late eating, which in the United States is often combined with portions of large, over-processed, fatty food. Europeans have fewer cases of reflux than we do, even though many of them eat late. That’s most likely from portion control. In France, for example, a serving of ice cream is typically a single modest scoop, while in America, it’s often three gargantuan scoops.

For my patients, eating late is often accompanied by overeating, because many skip breakfast and eat only a sandwich at lunch. Thus the evening meal becomes the largest meal of the day. After that heavy meal, it’s off to the sofa to watch television. After eating, it’s important to stay upright because gravity helps keep the contents in the stomach. Reflux is the result of acid spilling out of the stomach, and lying down with a full stomach makes reflux much more likely.

And if you add an after-dinner dessert or bedtime snack? Again, reflux is a natural consequence. In a healthy young person, the stomach normally takes a few hours to empty after a moderate-size meal. In older people or those who have reflux, gastric emptying is often delayed. Further, those dessert calories tend to be high in carbohydrates and fat, and high-fat foods often create reflux by slowing digestion and relaxing the stomach valve that normally prevents reflux. Other popular but notoriously bad-for-nighttime-reflux foods and beverages are mints, chocolate, soft drinks and alcohol.

Many of my patients find that eating earlier alleviates their allergies,sinusitis, asthma, sleep apnea and diabetes symptoms. Although these conditions may not seem linked, postnasal drip and a cough are typical reflux symptoms that can easily be mistaken for something else.

Some of my patients who arrive complaining of reflux already eat healthfully. For them, dining too late is often the sole cause of their problem. And yet, hearing that they need to change the timing of their meals is sometimes a challenge they cannot meet.

A New Yorker with reflux came to see me because both her father and uncle died of esophageal cancer and she was afraid of getting it, too. This patient was a prominent businesswoman and her nightly routine included a 9 p.m. dinner at an elegant restaurant with at least two bottles of good red wine for the table. Her reflux was serious, and I explained that changes were needed.

She listened, then left and did not come back to see me for a year. When I saw her again, she explained what had happened. “For the first two months I just hated you,” she told me, “and then for the next two months — I was having some trouble swallowing — I figured I was going to die of esophageal cancer.” Then she nudged me and added, “You know, we’re the reason that it’s not so easy to get 6 p.m. reservations at the good restaurants anymore.”

To stop the remarkable increase in reflux disease, we have to stop eating by 8 p.m., or whatever time falls at least three hours before bed. For many people, eating dinner early represents a significant lifestyle shift. It will require eating well-planned breakfasts, lunches and snacks, with healthy food and beverage choices.

—Copyright 2014 New York Times 

 

 

Dr. Jamie A. Koufman    Photo: Voice Institute of NY

 

Dr. Koufman is the Founder and Director of the Voice Institute of New York and co- author of the  New York Times best selling book: Dropping Acid: The Reflux Diet Cookbook & Cure.  

Follow Dr.  Koufman on Twitter (@RefluxDoctor) and connect with her on Facebook. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Koufman, Jaime A. “The Dangers of Eating Late at Night.” The New York Times, October 26, 2014, Accessed: November 7, 2014.  Access the original article: nytimes.com